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How to find if SQL 2008 has been installed with default instance or named instance.

Posted on 2014-07-16
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Last Modified: 2014-07-23
Hi
I have 2008 SQL server installed on 2003 server. I am now going to migrate the Database to a new SQL 2012 server that I am going to install.

Firstly: Is there a way to find if the old SQL server was installed with Named instance or default instance.
If it is named instance , how do I find the instances names.

Secondly: I am installing SQL Server 2012 64bit version on a windows 2012R2 64bit, during the
Feature selection windows and Shared feature directory.
It gives me a default path as shown below.
Shared Feature Directory:  C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\
Shared Feature Directory(x86): C:\Program Files(x86)\Microsoft SQL Server\

But I am going to install it on D drive.
(Path 1) So my path will be
Shared Feature Directory:  D:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\
Shared Feature Directory(x86): D:\Program Files(x86)\Microsoft SQL Server\

(Path 2)
I noticed some videos that they change the Shared feature Directory path as
Shared Feature Directory:  D:\Microsoft SQL Server\
Shared Feature Directory(x86): D:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\

For Best practice ,If I select D: for the shared feature, do in need to give the path as per path 1 or 2
Does the Program files(x86) path really matter as I am installing the 64bit version 0f SQL.

Please suggest any help much appreciated!
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Question by:lianne143
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by:EvilKnievel
EvilKnievel earned 1336 total points
ID: 40198900
Hi,
You can check the services on your server to see if SQL is a default or named instance. In case of a default instance you will only see the SQL service registered as something like MSSQLSERVICE. In case of a named instance, the instance name will be added to the service name like this: MSSQLSERVICE (instance name)

For your second question, i would only change the drive letter from C: to D: in the installation windows, that way it will Always be clear where the 32 bit and 64 bit components are.

Hope this helps you out a bit.
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Author Comment

by:lianne143
ID: 40198927
So for my understanding do I need to leave it as

Shared Feature Directory:  D:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\
Shared Feature Directory(x86): D:\Program Files(x86)\Microsoft SQL Server\

 OR

Shared Feature Directory:  D:\Microsoft SQL Server\
Shared Feature Directory(x86): D:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\
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by:Mohammed Khawaja
Mohammed Khawaja earned 664 total points
ID: 40199011
To find if you have installed SQL as an instance, start SQL Server Management Studio and click on browse.  If SQL servers are found in the form of servername\instancename then it is not default install.  You could also look at services as mentioned above.

With respect to file locations, SQL server by default installs shared files used by all instances in one location and once a new instance is installed, instance specific files will be installed in a different location.
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EvilKnievel earned 1336 total points
ID: 40199362
For the file location i would keep it like this:
Shared Feature Directory:  D:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\
Shared Feature Directory(x86): D:\Program Files(x86)\Microsoft SQL Server\
But that's just me ;)
It doesn't really matter where you install the shared features, as long as the 32 and 64 bit components aren't in the same folder.
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