[Last Call] Learn how to a build a cloud-first strategyRegister Now

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 50
  • Last Modified:

How do I move EVERYTHING from an old SQL 2008 server to a new physical machine with SQL 2008?

We have some new hardware that we are putting in place to replace the physical hardware of our old SQL 2008 machine. The new machine has a fresh installation of SQL 2008 (same version as the old machine).

What is the recommended way to migrate all tables, users, SQL agent, ... everything... from the old SQL server to the new one?

Thanks!
0
dbrennecke
Asked:
dbrennecke
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
5 Solutions
 
Peter HutchisonSenior Network Systems SpecialistCommented:
You will need to move databases, users, permissions, logs, jobs, alerts, operators and any DTS packages to the new server.
A more details step by step guide is here: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314546
0
 
Scott PletcherSenior DBACommented:
Make sure the new machine has exactly the same SQL Server version and sub-version as the old machine.

Then backup and restore all your databases (except model (unless you've customized model a lot)), in this order:
1) master (requires special steps, including stopping and restarting SQL)
2) msdb (may not require stopping and restarting SQL, but I'd do it if you could)
--Don't worry after that if user dbs show errors/warnings in SSMS.
3) user dbs.
0
 
Scott PletcherSenior DBACommented:
You can also try the "overlay" method of replacing the master db.

Shut down the new SQL.  
In the old SQL, temporarily modify the old master file locations for model and tempdb to match the new server.  Stop SQL.  Copy the master and model files to the new server.
Start the new SQL.  If it comes up OK, you're good, and can go on restoring or attaching user databases.
0
Configuration Guide and Best Practices

Read the guide to learn how to orchestrate Data ONTAP, create application-consistent backups and enable fast recovery from NetApp storage snapshots. Version 9.5 also contains performance and scalability enhancements to meet the needs of the largest enterprise environments.

 
dbrenneckeAuthor Commented:
OK. I will look to try this out shortly.... But, before I do, I have an additional question.

While the SQL versions are identical, the product is different, i.e. going from Enterprise to Standard. Does that have any influence on these recommendations?
0
 
Peter HutchisonSenior Network Systems SpecialistCommented:
Enterprise versions are usually used for things like Clustered SQL servers, data warehousing, indexing, snapshots etc  and other advanced features. So, you need to check if any of those features are used and whether you can live w/o them.
0
 
dbrenneckeAuthor Commented:
Right.. The only thing we use is clustering with 2 nodes, which is supported by Standard.
0
 
Scott PletcherSenior DBACommented:
>> While the SQL versions are identical, the product is different, i.e. going from Enterprise to Standard. Does that have any influence on these recommendations? <<

It should not, since the db's internals are the same (at least as I understand it) no matter which edition of SQL is being used.
0

Featured Post

 [eBook] Windows Nano Server

Download this FREE eBook and learn all you need to get started with Windows Nano Server, including deployment options, remote management
and troubleshooting tips and tricks

  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now