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CAL requirements

A client currently has SERVER 2003 running Terminal Services with SBS 2011 as the domain controller. I want to get him off SERVER 2003 for everything except their accounting system due to the OS age. The accounting system will not run on a newer OS and would require 10's of thousands of $$ to upgrade - not in the cards now.

What do I need in the way of CALs for SERVER 2012R2 and RDS? I know I need RDS CALs. Do I also need SERVER CALs to simply connect to the server to then run RDS? I have a vague recollection of needing both types of CALs.
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johncarullo
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johncarullo
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3 Solutions
 
tankergoblinCommented:
Since you still need server 2003 for accounting purpose and user previously can connect to your 2003 server so no issue. just dont remove your server from your network. that all. One question are you going to upgrade your DC?
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
If you want to add a 2012 server to an SBS network, you need Windows CALs and if you want that 2012 server to be an RDS server then you need RDS CALs.  CALs are additive and not inclusive - RDS CALs do not include Windows CALs.
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Adam RayCommented:
To restate what Lee W said:

An SBS2011 CAL does not cover a 2012 server. So if you add a 2012 member server to a SBS2011 domain, you will need Sever 2012 CALs in addition to you SBS2011 CALs.

Of course you will also need your 2012 RDS CALs.

As an FYI, you may also be in need of Server 2003 Term Services CALs if you don't already have them. (Windows XP Pro implicitly included a licensing for accessing 2003 Term Server, but later versions of Windows desktop OS's do NOT include any TS/RDS client access licensing.*)

*Although with as screwy as M$ licensing is, if your Win7/8 desktop licenses include downgrade rights to XP, maybe the implicit 2003 TS CAL still applies???
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tankergoblinCommented:
if not mistaken ms will give you 5 cal for free. if depend on the package you bought from your vendor.
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Adam RayCommented:
@tankergoblin   Yes and no. Many of the Microsoft Server licenses include a small number of CALs. If you're buying retail or OEM licensing anyway. 5 CALs is common, but the number varies with different products/editions.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
(Windows XP Pro implicitly included a licensing for accessing 2003 Term Server, but later versions of Windows desktop OS's do NOT include any TS/RDS client access licensing.*)

The "included" RDS/TS CALs were with Windows 2000 Pro.  In 2003 and XP (and later) you were required to purchase CALs for all systems.
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Adam RayCommented:
Gah, my second licensing gaff in as many days. At least with this one I was only half wrong--I had research it again to satisfy myself. The "included" TS license was in the server side of NT 4.0 and Win2000. So a Windows 2000 Pro or XP Pro desktop could access a 2000 TS without an additional license.

Lee is right about Server 2003 TS though, it always required purchasing a CAL. (With the semi-exception being a temporary offer from Microsoft for a free 2003 TS CAL for copies of XP purchases prior to the release of Server 2003.)

But I'm getting off topic of the original post, so I digress.
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tankergoblinCommented:
All of the OS client talking above are out of date and i think MS does not support on the update anymore. Better use win7 and above.
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johncarulloAuthor Commented:
Environment is a mixed bag of PCs and thin clients. Current have 15 CALs for 2003 and 2011 which is sufficient. So I guess I need 15 2012 device CALs and 15 RDS CALs for 2012?
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
If your users ONLY connect from the office, then that's fine.  If they EVER connect remotely - to access a file, get e-mail, etc., then you need USER CALs otherwise, you'd need device CALs for their remote devices and possibly cell phones and tablets.  While the pricing structure has changed on CALs, it's USUALLY better to be purchasing USER CALs and assigning them to HUMAN BEINGS (not accounts - user CALs are administratively assigned to people and not accounts).

I think it's about time for this:
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