Solved

Where do we go from here -  Access 2010 the last full version for the traditional desktop

Posted on 2014-07-18
7
276 Views
Last Modified: 2014-07-21
Transparency:
The points for this question will probably be given to either Jack Leach,  Joe Anderson, or  Jim Dettman for the great job they did on this  Question .
All opinions are invited.

The Question:
I agree with Jim's statement below - so if Access 2010 is the end of good desktop apps for Access -
   * What tool are people going to now.
   * What's the best way to learn the tool you recommend considering you have been programming Access VBA with SQL Server backend for many years?

Jim Dettman said in an answer "I would consider A2010 the last full version for the traditional desktop side"

Thanks in advance.
LJG
0
Comment
Question by:LJG
7 Comments
 
LVL 32

Expert Comment

by:ste5an
ID: 40204959
D'oh? Access 2013 supports still the desktop. The only difference is the missing Upsizing Wiziard.. ;) And for Web Apps: They are an add-on.. like .adp.
0
 
LVL 19

Expert Comment

by:Iammontoya
ID: 40205005
FileMaker is a really nice solution. Easy to use and with the addition of FileMaker Go, moving solutions to IPAD/Iphone, etc... is a breeze. It has its limits, as those everything else.

There's also a new player out there.. http://www.kexi-project.org/
0
 
LVL 57

Accepted Solution

by:
Jim Dettman (Microsoft MVP/ EE MVE) earned 500 total points
ID: 40205006
I made the comment that I consider A2010 to be the last "full" desktop version reason being a number of long standing features were removed (Replication, ADP's, DBF support, command bar's, etc) and since the focus on the web, nothing new has been done on the desktop side.

 From my viewpoint, only things that make it easier for end users to do things have been added on the desktop side, and it's all things that developers have been doing for years (attachments, MVF's, PDF support, etc).  Access itself and ACE have really not advanced at all in terms of capabilities (if you don't consider the web).  For example, long standing developer requests, such more PEMs with the screen object have not been done.

Microsoft's focus since 2007 has clearly been on the web, and I doubt they'll go anywhere else at this point.

My .02,
Jim.
0
How your wiki can always stay up-to-date

Quip doubles as a “living” wiki and a project management tool that evolves with your organization. As you finish projects in Quip, the work remains, easily accessible to all team members, new and old.
- Increase transparency
- Onboard new hires faster
- Access from mobile/offline

 
LVL 32

Expert Comment

by:ste5an
ID: 40205155
Okay, I see. The web focus is correct. Another focus was to attract more information workers to Access. Clearly out of focus was the entire hard-core developer and programmer bunch.
0
 
LVL 57
ID: 40208714
I'll add a little more and make sure the questions here are answered, which are different than what was asked in the other thread.

<<  * What tool are people going to now.>>

  Many Access developers have moved to .Net.  Alpha 5 is another popular choice.   But let me add that Access Desktop Databases are certainly not dead yet.  Although we as developers haven't gotten any new features, Access will be usable as a development tool for some time to come.   I expect to retire in ten years still doing Access work.

<<  * What's the best way to learn the tool you recommend considering you have been programming Access VBA with SQL Server backend for many years?>>

  I would be looking at some form of .Net coupled with a framework, such as Dev Express.

Jim.
0
 
LVL 2

Author Comment

by:LJG
ID: 40208887
Thanks Jim!
0

Featured Post

How your wiki can always stay up-to-date

Quip doubles as a “living” wiki and a project management tool that evolves with your organization. As you finish projects in Quip, the work remains, easily accessible to all team members, new and old.
- Increase transparency
- Onboard new hires faster
- Access from mobile/offline

Join & Write a Comment

Suggested Solutions

When you are entering numbers in a speadsheet, and don't remember what 6×7 is, you just type “=6*7" instead. It works in every cell! This is not so in Access. To enter the elusive 42 in a text box, you have to find a calculator, and then copy the re…
Describes a method of obtaining an object variable to an already running instance of Microsoft Access so that it can be controlled via automation.
As developers, we are not limited to the functions provided by the VBA language. In addition, we can call the functions that are part of the Windows operating system. These functions are part of the Windows API (Application Programming Interface). U…
In Microsoft Access, learn the trick to repeating sub-report headings at the top of each page. The problem with sub-reports and headings: Add a dummy group to the sub report using the expression =1: Set the “Repeat Section” property of the dummy…

757 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question

Need Help in Real-Time?

Connect with top rated Experts

21 Experts available now in Live!

Get 1:1 Help Now