What is the maximum number of applications each application pool can handle?

Currently, I am using Window 2003 standard with 4GB memory and 14 application Pools in the server.
There are 200+ applications. I am currently rearrange the applications vs application pools and would like to find out
best practice in order to best distributed applications among each application Pools ?
Panda 5888EngineerAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

duncanb7Commented:
Could you try to use Microsoft taskmanager ? Type taskmage.exe on command shell, and then click process tab->Resources monitor
You can use ProcessExplorer , the process monitor tools,  from Microsoft,http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb896653.aspx

It should work since Window XP and it should also work  for window XP, window server ,window 7,8

Duncan
0
Esteban BlancoPresidentCommented:
Well this can vary.  In IIS 6.0 I believe you can have 1,000 apps but only 200 will run concurrently.

You can reduce the amount of app pools that are running when in standby (the ones not handling requests but that are using system resources), make the "IdleTimeout metabase" value for the application pool lower.  To do this within IIS manager, make the pool’s "Shutdown worker processes after being idle for" setting on the Performance tab of the application pool’s Properties lower.  Out of the box is 20 minutes, but you can modify this based on what you need it to do.

Keep in mind that this is dependent on many things like what is being served, what's running concurrently, identities of the application pools (network service for example), etc.  Another thing is that if you have a lot of worker processes running within the same app pool, you can start losing resources.

I have this Technet article that may help:
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff426423(v=ws.10).aspx

Also, be mindful that 2003 is coming to end of life in July of 2015 and with 32 bit standard, you are stuck at 4 GB.  Upgrading (if allowed by the business) is something I would recommend in the near future so you can dedicate proper resources to the vast amount of apps you are hosting.  This gives you a little less than a year to prepare and upgrade .NET apps if that's what you are running.

I hope this gives you a good starting point.

-Esteban
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
System Utilities

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.

Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.