Solved

Can I tell what email client was used to send a message by viewing header info

Posted on 2014-07-21
3
375 Views
Last Modified: 2014-07-21
I have a PDF that gets sent out and electronically signed and sent back, then routed with other contract data to others.  Sometimes when this document is sent back, the contract (PDF) is inverted, it is upside down and reversed, and about 5% of its previous size.  I am trying to find a pattern, but in looking at the header info from the incoming messages, I cannot see the client info.  I see all of the servers that the message has been touched by, but I thought the client version was in there also.  Anyone can help with this?
0
Comment
Question by:SIDESHOWBLAH
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
  • 2
3 Comments
 
LVL 95

Accepted Solution

by:
John Hurst earned 250 total points
ID: 40209001
Open the message in Outlook and choose File, Properties. You can see the headers in there and X-Mailer is normally the client used to send.

There is more than one way to create a PDF in terms of scanners and the other party may have used a different scanner and put the new page in upside down to you and right side up to them. Hard to say on that one.
0
 
LVL 54

Assisted Solution

by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016
Joe Winograd, EE MVE 2015&2016 earned 250 total points
ID: 40209091
I just looked at the Internet headers of several messages in my Outlook 2013 client. In some of them, the sending email client is in a field called User-Agent, such as:

User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:24.0) Gecko/20100101 Thunderbird/24.3.0

In others, it's in a field called X-Mailer, such as:

X-Mailer: Microsoft Office Outlook 12.0

But in others, I can't find it anywhere, although some fields seem to indicate a web-based mailer, such as Outlook.com:

Received: from BN1PR03MB108.namprd03.prod.outlook.com

So there seems to be no universal, consistent answer. In terms of the PDF, you say that it is "electronically signed", so it probably has not been printed out and scanned back in. It is more likely that the electronic signing process has caused the PDF to be inverted/upside down/reversed and about 5% of its original size. I doubt very much that the email client did that — much more likely that the digital signing did it. Regards, Joe
0
 
LVL 95

Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 40209646
@SIDESHOWBLAH  - Thank you and I was happy to help.
0

Featured Post

NEW Veeam Agent for Microsoft Windows

Backup and recover physical and cloud-based servers and workstations, as well as endpoint devices that belong to remote users. Avoid downtime and data loss quickly and easily for Windows-based physical or public cloud-based workloads!

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

When you have clients or friends from around the world, it becomes a challenge to arrange a meeting or effectively manage your time. This is where Outlook's capability to show 2 time zones in one calendar comes in handy.
Outlook for dependable use in a very small business   This article is about using the Outlook application (part of Microsoft Office) in a very small business, or for homeowners where dependability and reliability are critical requirements. This …
Many of my clients call in with monstrous Gmail overloading issues with Outlook. A quick tip is to turn off the All Mail and Important folders from synching. Here is a quick video I made to show you how to turn off these and other folders in Gmail s…
CodeTwo Sync for iCloud (http://www.codetwo.com/sync-for-icloud?sts=6554) automatically synchronizes your Outlook 2016, 2013, 2010 or 2007 folders with iCloud folders available via iCloud Control Panel. This lets you automatically sync them with…

729 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question