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Can I tell what email client was used to send a message by viewing header info

Posted on 2014-07-21
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Last Modified: 2014-07-21
I have a PDF that gets sent out and electronically signed and sent back, then routed with other contract data to others.  Sometimes when this document is sent back, the contract (PDF) is inverted, it is upside down and reversed, and about 5% of its previous size.  I am trying to find a pattern, but in looking at the header info from the incoming messages, I cannot see the client info.  I see all of the servers that the message has been touched by, but I thought the client version was in there also.  Anyone can help with this?
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Question by:SIDESHOWBLAH
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John Hurst earned 250 total points
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Open the message in Outlook and choose File, Properties. You can see the headers in there and X-Mailer is normally the client used to send.

There is more than one way to create a PDF in terms of scanners and the other party may have used a different scanner and put the new page in upside down to you and right side up to them. Hard to say on that one.
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by:Joe Winograd, EE MVE
Joe Winograd, EE MVE earned 250 total points
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I just looked at the Internet headers of several messages in my Outlook 2013 client. In some of them, the sending email client is in a field called User-Agent, such as:

User-Agent: Mozilla/5.0 (Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; rv:24.0) Gecko/20100101 Thunderbird/24.3.0

In others, it's in a field called X-Mailer, such as:

X-Mailer: Microsoft Office Outlook 12.0

But in others, I can't find it anywhere, although some fields seem to indicate a web-based mailer, such as Outlook.com:

Received: from BN1PR03MB108.namprd03.prod.outlook.com

So there seems to be no universal, consistent answer. In terms of the PDF, you say that it is "electronically signed", so it probably has not been printed out and scanned back in. It is more likely that the electronic signing process has caused the PDF to be inverted/upside down/reversed and about 5% of its original size. I doubt very much that the email client did that — much more likely that the digital signing did it. Regards, Joe
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by:John Hurst
ID: 40209646
@SIDESHOWBLAH  - Thank you and I was happy to help.
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