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using dns in dmz for queries.  Good Idea?

Posted on 2014-07-22
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Last Modified: 2014-07-29
Just wanted some general ideas about preventing AD servers from DNS lookups (just forwarding) and instead use a DNS server in the DMZ (probably Linux) doing the actual lookups.  Our security guy wants to do this and was wondering what the implications are.

Has anyone had any good or bad experiences with this kind of setup?  

I assume it's not that common any more?
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Question by:billFmurray
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by:Cliff Galiher
ID: 40212825
Well, many things in AD *need* DNS to work right, so getting such a setup would still require the DMZ DNS server to talk to the AD DNS server, virtually eliminating any security benefit. I'm not sure I understand the purpose.
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DrDave242 earned 500 total points
ID: 40215650
Just wanted some general ideas about preventing AD servers from DNS lookups (just forwarding) and instead use a DNS server in the DMZ (probably Linux) doing the actual lookups.
Are you referring to external lookups (i.e., resolution of internet names)? DNS is used extensively for internal lookups by everything in the domain, so you wouldn't want to restrict that, but yes, you can restrict external lookups if you'd like. Your domain controllers can be configured to use the DMZ server as their only forwarder, and that server can then do the dirty work. You can then configure the firewall so that only DNS queries from your DCs are allowed to pass from the LAN to the DMZ, and only DNS queries from the DMZ server are allowed to pass through to the internet.

One disadvantage that I can see is that there's a single point of failure anytime you use only one forwarder: if your DMZ DNS server goes down, nobody in the domain will be able to get to the internet until it comes back up or you do a bit of reconfiguration.
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