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Perl Script Problem

Posted on 2014-07-22
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Last Modified: 2014-07-23
Hello, I'm wondering if someone can help. How can you convert "2014-07-22 05:34:06" to seconds using perl? I've been having trouble doing the math. Already did tons of array but there could be easier way to do it. :)
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Question by:SuperRoot
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Expert Comment

by:wilcoxon
ID: 40213385
use Date::Calc;
my $seconds = Mktime(2014,7,22,5,34,6);

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Author Comment

by:SuperRoot
ID: 40213415
hmmm... It seems like I need Date::calc module?

Undefined subroutine &main::Mktime called at ./script.pl line 89.
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Expert Comment

by:wilcoxon
ID: 40213434
Yes.  If Date::Calc isn't installed on your system, you'll need to install it.  "cpanm Date::Calc" or "cpan -i Date::Calc" will do it (assuming you have permissions to install to the primary perllib dir).  If not, you can install it into your own directory by:
download Date::Calc
perl Makefile.PL PREFIX=<dir>
make test
make install

If you do that, then you'll need to add "use lib '<dir>';" above the "use Date::Calc".
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Expert Comment

by:wilcoxon
ID: 40213437
Hmm.  Although maybe not.  It looks like Date::Calc doesn't export any functions by default.  Try this:
use strict;
use warnings;
use Date::Calc qw(Mktime);
my $seconds = Mktime(2014,7,22,5,34,6);

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Expert Comment

by:Surrano
ID: 40213635
Or using Time::Local which I believe is part of any std distrib:

require "timelocal.pl";
print timelocal(6,34,5,22,7,2014),"\n";

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Expert Comment

by:wilcoxon
ID: 40214767
timelocal.pl was removed in Perl 5.20 (per the message in Perl 5.18 at least).,,  Or maybe it already was removed...

Legacy library timelocal.pl will be removed from the Perl core distribution in the next major release. Please install it from the CPAN distribution Perl4::CoreLibs.
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Expert Comment

by:Surrano
ID: 40214797
Ooops. Seems our systems need a major revamp :)
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Author Comment

by:SuperRoot
ID: 40214952
I might just end up doing a lot of array for each character and multiply then add them up to create the seconds. This is a lot of logic which I hate :( The numbers in "print timelocal(6,34,5,22,7,2014),"\n";" changes everyday so I think its easier just to do the math?
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Accepted Solution

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wilcoxon earned 500 total points
ID: 40215135
Not really.  Assuming the date is always in the format you provide in your question, you can just do:
use strict;
use warnings;
use Date::Calc qw(Mktime);
my $date = "2014-07-22 05:34:06"; # get this via command line or file or however you want
my $seconds = Mktime(split /[- :]/, $date); # that's a space between - and :

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Author Closing Comment

by:SuperRoot
ID: 40215214
that worked! Thank you!
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