Retrieve a dropped constraint

A constraint with a system generated name (SYS_CXXXXXXX) was accidentally dropped. Is there a way to add it back. The script for the constraint is not saved and I am not even sure on what table the constraint was applied so that I could do a comparison with the datamodel

Thanks,
gs79Asked:
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johnsoneSenior Oracle DBACommented:
The only way I can think of that you might be able to retrieve it is with LogMiner.  You would have to have archive log mode turned on and know the timeframe when the drop occurred so that you could grab the correct archive(s).  It should give you the command to put back the constraint.

The documentation for LogMiner is here:

http://docs.oracle.com/cd/E11882_01/server.112/e22490/logminer.htm#SUTIL019
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slightwv (䄆 Netminder) Commented:
You might also look at restoring a backup to a different server and see what it was.
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MikeOM_DBACommented:
Constraints like "SYS_CXXXXXXX" are check constraints (99% of them "NOT NULL" constraints).
If you have a test or qa instance you could compare the schema's to production.
;)
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johnsoneSenior Oracle DBACommented:
They are not necessarily check constraints.  They can be any kind of unnamed constraint.  As long as you create it without a name, it will get a SYS_C prefix.

Take for example these 2 statements:

CREATE TABLE t 
  ( 
     x NUMBER PRIMARY KEY 
  ); 

CREATE TABLE u 
  ( 
     x NUMBER, 
     y NUMBER PRIMARY KEY, 
     FOREIGN KEY (x) REFERENCES t(x) 
  ); 

Open in new window


That will create 2 primary keys and one referential integrity constraint.  All of them will be prefixed with SYS_C.  At least they all were in the 11gR2 system I just ran those statements on.
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