How to create wavy underlines in Word, as for misspelled words?

Simply, I need to EXACTLY replicate the (red, green) wavy underlines under words in a Word document, exactly as seen when there are some spelling or grammar errors.

I tried ActiveDocument.Words(4).Underline = wdUnderlineWavy
It does do something similar, but it is not an exact replication. This wavy line is differently shaped then Word’s spelling error underline. Moreover, the Word’s spelling error red underline can be at the same time combined with any other underline style (set by user: wavy, single, double…), while wdUnderlineWavy is not, i.e. it is simply one of the standard user formatting underlines, mutually exclusive with wdUnderlineSingle, wdUnderlineDouble for instance…
npaunAsked:
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Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger)Connect With a Mentor PresidentCommented:
Oh, sorry. I had never used it so it did not come to my mind, but looking again, I see you can define the underline color.

ActiveDocument.Words(4).Underline = wdUnderlineWavy
ActiveDocument.Words(4).UnderlineColor = wdColorRed

The result is exactly similar to what you get from the spelling checker, except that you will not be able to mix it with other underline types.

What do you want to show with your wavy line? There might be another way to attract the attention of the user. You might want to use some of the Text Effects that are available.
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Paul SauvéRetiredCommented:
Have you tried this?Underline
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npaunAuthor Commented:
Sorry, I probably should emphasize it more: to do it grammatically, using VB6 or VBA...
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Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger)PresidentCommented:
Selection.Font.Underline = wdUnderlineWavy

However, do not think of coloring the underline and leaving the text in black. Since there is not way to manually set the underline color to something else than the text color, you cannot do it in code. The underline is part of the font.

The wigglies (that is the name Microsoft gives to those wavy lines) are not part of the text (they are not printed). They are only added by the software itself as an indication that something happens. So no way to duplicate them exactly as they show. wdUnderline is the closest you can get.
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npaunAuthor Commented:
Damn...
Is there maybe a way to simulate this by doing something to .SpellingChecked and .GrammarChecked properties? To trick the Word to think that some words are misspelled and show the wigglies?
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npaunAuthor Commented:
Well, I have to make a spell-checking add-in for word. It is for a non-english language, and with custom procedures and specific options, so I cannot simply use the built-in spellchecker with a custom non-english dictionary... so I'm in a need to exactly replicate this wiggling feature too...
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Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger)PresidentCommented:
Microsoft sells language packs for a lot of languages. You might be interested in following that option: http://www.microsoftstore.com/store/msca/en_CA/pdp/productID.247097500?cdid=en%2Dca
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Paul SauvéRetiredCommented:
What language is your version of Word and what language do you need?

You may find it in File tab -> Options -> Language then click on [Add additional editing languages]LanguagesYou may find that the language you need is in the list...
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npaunAuthor Commented:
No, I'm aware that MS offers additional languages, even free in the case I'm interested (Serbian)... but as I said, it is not an option, as the spellchecker I'm working on has to be custom made and has to use a custom, non-Microsoft database of words...
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Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger)PresidentCommented:
Could you please explain how something that is free and comes from Microsoft is not an option?

I had to work on a custom spelling checker in the 80's. OK, we did not have the kind of processing we have nowadays. But I can tell you that the work required to make something efficient is awesome. And this was in software that I developed myself. Incorporating it inside of something like Word would be even harder, because Word has not been designed in a ways that you can interact with it outside of the object model that Microsoft provided.
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