Want to protect your cyber security and still get fast solutions? Ask a secure question today.Go Premium

x
?
Solved

Microsoft Access SQL Query

Posted on 2014-07-24
6
Medium Priority
?
555 Views
Last Modified: 2014-07-24
Can I write an SQL query in MS Access 2002?

Specifically, "SELECT * from Workorder where DateEntered > 3/1/2014".

I am accustomed to using MySQL where the date is stored yyyy-mm-dd; not sure if the Access date format is correct as I stated it.

If I can do this, how do I build it (in Access) & Run it? Can I store the "result set" as a table?

Thanks
0
Comment
Question by:Richard Korts
  • 3
  • 2
6 Comments
 
LVL 120

Expert Comment

by:Rey Obrero (Capricorn1)
ID: 40217548
if [DateEntered] is DateTime field you need to enclose the date value in #

"SELECT * from Workorder where DateEntered > #3/1/2014#"
0
 

Author Comment

by:Richard Korts
ID: 40217580
OK, but I'm not familiar with how / where to compose the query, etc.

I used Access, YEARS ago.

Thanks
0
 
LVL 40

Accepted Solution

by:
PatHartman earned 2000 total points
ID: 40217620
Dates in Access and most other RDBMS' are not stored as strings.  They are stored as double precision numbers where the integer portion represents the number of days since a particular date which is referred to as the origin date.  The decimal portion represents the time since midnight.

print cdbl(now())
 41844.5865393519
print now()
7/24/2014 2:04:41 PM
So for the above example, there have been 41844 days since Dec 30, 1899 which is what Access uses as the origin date.   Other RDBMS' and also Excel and Word use the same concept but different origin dates.  

To create a query against a linked table in Access, the simplest method is to just open the query designer.  The opening dialog lets you choose tables and/or queries.  Once they are selected, close the dialog.  Then draw join lines between all the tables/queries you selected.  Next, choose the columns you want from each table/query.  And the final step is to add any criteria if necessary.  So, in your case, you would put:

> #3/1/2014#

in the criteria cell beneath the DateEntered field.

The format of a date is ONLY relevant to people.  Access defaults to the windows default date format which in the US is normally "mm/dd/yyyy".  In other countries it could be "dd/mm/yyyy".  In either case, the data is stored internally the same way as a double precision number.
0
What does it mean to be "Always On"?

Is your cloud always on? With an Always On cloud you won't have to worry about downtime for maintenance or software application code updates, ensuring that your bottom line isn't affected.

 

Author Comment

by:Richard Korts
ID: 40217688
I can't just write a simple SQL Query in Access?
0
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:PatHartman
ID: 40217713
That IS how you create a query in Access.  If you prefer, you can switch to SQL view and type it yourself.  If you are talking about running a query in code, you can write whatever SQL string you want or run a saved querydef.  Keep in mind that saved querydefs are more efficient than embedded SQL since the first time the querydef runs, Access calculates an execution plan and saves it.  Access then reuses the execution plan each time you run the query.  If the SQL is embedded in code, there is no way for Access to save an execution plan so each time you run the query, Access has to recalculate the execution plan.

I suggested the querydef (QBE) as the path of least resistance.  If you are not familiar with Access, you are unlikely to be familiar with its version of SQL syntax.  Using a visual interface eliminates the typing and syntax errors.
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:Richard Korts
ID: 40217818
OK, it was pretty easy with the Query Builder.
0

Featured Post

Receive 1:1 tech help

Solve your biggest tech problems alongside global tech experts with 1:1 help.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

If you need a simple but flexible process for maintaining an audit trail of who created, edited, or deleted data from a table, or multiple tables, and you can do all of your work from within a form, this simple Audit Log will work for you.
Sometimes MS breaks things just for fun... In Access 2003, only the maximum allowable SQL string length could cause problems as you built a recordset. Now, when using string data in a WHERE clause, the 'identifier' maximum is 128 characters. So, …
Add bar graphs to Access queries using Unicode block characters. Graphs appear on every record in the color you want. Give life to numbers. Hopes this gives you ideas on visualizing your data in new ways ~ Create a calculated field in a query: …
With just a little bit of  SQL and VBA, many doors open to cool things like synchronize a list box to display data relevant to other information on a form.  If you have never written code or looked at an SQL statement before, no problem! ...  give i…
Suggested Courses

577 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question