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Microsoft -- multi-server CALs

Posted on 2014-07-24
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Last Modified: 2014-08-10
I have 100 users with the below old
Microsoft servers that need upgrading
  server #1 = MS File/Domain/Print
  server #2 = MS SQL Database
  server #3 = MS IIS external web frontend
  server #4 = MS SharePoint external web frontend
  server #5 = MS Exchange external web frontend

1.  Can I get some type of "multi-server CAL" that does all of the above OR do I need to purchase CALS for each server ?

2.  Can I just purchase the SERVER upgrade and NOT have to purchase CAL upgrades ?

If cost is TOO high I plan to put some items in the CLOUD.
I do not want a Microsoft EA agreement since we only upgrade once every six years.
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Question by:finance_teacher
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Cliff Galiher earned 100 total points
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First, disclaimer: don't trust forums for licensing advice, that's a great way to cost you even more in the long run.

Now, windows licensing is per user or per device. Not per server.

Exchange and SharePoint are per user.

Your web front ends depends on how you are using the products. You'll need CALs or an external connector (which *is* per server.)

And new product versions need new versions of the CALs. The cloud is certainly an alternative.
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by:Ken
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Each server needs a Windows Server license so consider virtualizing some servers if the hardware purchased supports your environment. Depending how you acquire the server licenses (OEM, Open, Volume) you may be entitled to some virtual server licenses. For example, if you get Windows Server Standard Open License, and you only install the Hyper-V role,  you can install two virtual servers on the same physical machine with the same license.

Then you need upgraded User or Device CALs that match the Windows Server version and application version.
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by:Ken
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To clarify, the server operating system needs a server CAL, but you also need user/device CALS.  But the user/device CALs are not per server. They cover the entire environment. But they are specific to the latest edition of your server/application. So if you have a Windows Server 2012 server, then you need Windows Server 2012 User/Device CALs for each user/device. If you have three servers and 20 users. You need a Windows OS license for each server and you need a total of 20 user/device CALs. If you add in Exchange 2010, then you need server OS licenses, server user CALS and user/device CALS for Exchange 2010. IF you already had CALS for a prior version of Exchange, you will need to purchase CALS for the new version of Exchange.
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by:Cliff Galiher
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"To clarify, the server operating system needs a server CAL"

Not trying to be pedantic, but when it comes to licensing, details matter. The operating system needs a server license. That *is not* a CAL. Historically (and for a few products, still true) there has been such a thing as a server CAL. So the distinction is important.
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by:Ken
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Yes, and I tried in all of my sentences to clearly state license or CAL. My mistake for saying CAL in that sentence, thank you for point that out.

I was trying to point out that you said -
"Now, windows licensing is per user or per device. Not per server."

But this is not accurate.

The Windows Operating System needs a license, then the users need CALS- Client Access Licenses for accessing the server resources. Then they also need CALS for specific applications such as Exchange and SQL.

Since Microsoft has discontinued SBS (which wouldn't apply with 100 users anyway) I don't know of a CAL that groups all of those applications together.
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by:Cliff Galiher
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The core CAL suites do group some applications together.
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Here is more info on Licensing Microsoft Servers-

http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/about-licensing/client-access-license.aspx#tab=1

Here is more info on the CAL suites that bundle some of the user/device CALS for software

http://www.microsoft.com/calsuites/en/us/default.aspx
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by:finance_teacher
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Looks like below is what everyone agrees on ?
If so, I will ask CDW.com to make sure
---------------------------------------------------------------------
   server #1 = MS File/Domain/Print
     ** 1 Windows OS server license
     ** 100 Windows OS CALs

   ADD-ONS
    ** none
---------------------------------------------------------------------
   server #2 = MS SQL Database
     ** 1 Windows OS server license
     ** 0 Windows OS CALs --> since already done on above "server #1"

   ADD-ONS
     ** 1 SQL server license, includes 2 processor-core licenses
     ** 2 SQL server processor-core licenses, since must do 4 TOTAL
        processor-core licenses per Microsoft if doing "CORE" licensing
---------------------------------------------------------------------
   server #3 = MS IIS external web frontend
     ** 1 Windows OS server license
     ** 0 Windows OS CALs --> since already done on above "server #1"

   ADD-ONS
     ** none
---------------------------------------------------------------------
   server #4 = MS SharePoint and external web frontend
     ** 1 Windows OS server license
     ** 0 Windows OS CALs --> since already done on above "server #1"

   ADD-ONS
     ** 1 SharePoint server license, includes 2 processor-core licenses
     ** 2 SharePoint server processor-core licenses, since must do 4 TOTAL
        processor-core licenses per Microsoft if doing "CORE" licensing
---------------------------------------------------------------------
   server #5 = MS Exchange and external web frontend
     ** 1 Windows OS server license
     ** 0 Windows OS CALs --> since already done on above "server #1"

   ADD-ONS
     ** 1 Exchange server license
     ** 100 Exchange server CALs
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by:Cliff Galiher
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A few corrections.

First, of you go the core route for SQL, you mist buy a license PER CORE. You listed two licenses and hinted that you thought that'd cover four cores total much like windows licenses cover two processors each. That is *incorrect.* one core license covers one core.

Also keep in mind that core licenses are definitely more expensive than server licenses. So server+CAL may make more sense depending on the workload.

SharePoint 2013 does not offer a core licensing model. You will be buying CALs for that.
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by:Ken
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Depending on how you are using SharePoint, you will need a server license and user CALs.

http://www.microsoft.com/licensing/about-licensing/briefs/SharepointServer2013.aspx

Also, don't forget to look at whether you can run any of the servers as virtual servers and take advantage of the virtual server licenses offered. If you purchase one Windows Server 2012 Standard license you get up to two virtual server instances. Look at the roles you will be installing.
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