SQL Server: table row insert/update datetime

Hi, how can I find table row insert and last update datetime?
Thanks.
quasar_eeAsked:
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Jim HornMicrosoft SQL Server Developer, Architect, and AuthorCommented:
The only way to pull that off is if there are columns to hold values for insert datetime and update datetime, and the inserting/updating query populates them.

Or, if the table has some kind of trigger which auto-magically adds them.

Otherwise, what you are asking is not possible.
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Russell FoxDatabase DeveloperCommented:
If you don't have a specific column to track that data, you'll need to go looking through the log files to find it. I always have DateCreated (default  = GETDATE()) and DateUpdated DATETIME columns in all relevant tables. Data is only updated through our stored procedures, so all updated procs do a "SET DateUpdated = GETDATE()". If you don't control your inputs with stored procedures or other code, you can also put in an ON UPDATE trigger to update that column whenever a record is changed, and that will fire even if you change bulk records through a query in Management Studio.
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Scott PletcherSenior DBACommented:
But be aware that you're widening the rows, and thus affecting overall performance of the table, by adding these columns.

Instead, if possible, I suggest using a trigger and storing that data in a separate table.  But most people don't do that.  Still, if you have a (very) large table with, say, 100M rows, even an additional 16 bytes per row is 1.6B bytes more in the table.  Moreover, many people also store a character id of who added and who changed, widening the row that much more.
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