• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 118
  • Last Modified:

finding records in table using the count()

I have an attendance table in sql where I store data for activities by organizations.  Each record in my attendancegrid is associated to a specific month and fiscal year.

I am looking to get all the Distinct records based on ID from my table that have a total > 0 throughout the whole year.  I would like to group it by activity and committee.

Here is what I am using.  Does it look like I am on the right track using the count() function?

SELECT committee, Activity, Count(Distinct ID) as NumberofParticipants FROM AttendanceGrid where Total > 0 
and Month IN ('July', 'August', 'September', 'October', 'November','December','January', 'February','March','April', 'May','June') 
And Fiscal = 2014 GROUP BY Committee, Activity order by Committee, Activity

Open in new window

0
al4629740
Asked:
al4629740
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • +1
2 Solutions
 
5teveoCommented:
move 'Distinct'

SELECT Distinct  committee, Activity, Count(ID) as NumberofParticipants FROM AttendanceGrid where Total > 0
and Month IN ('July', 'August', 'September', 'October', 'November','December','January', 'February','March','April', 'May','June')
And Fiscal = 2014 GROUP BY Committee, Activity order by Committee, Activity
0
 
Pooja Katiyar VermaCommented:
Rest of the query seems ok, you can remove month condition (as you are looking for all 12 months data)
0
 
al4629740Author Commented:
Why would I move distinct? Doesn't that make committee distinct if I did that?
0
[Webinar] Kill tickets & tabs using PowerShell

Are you tired of cycling through the same browser tabs everyday to close the same repetitive tickets? In this webinar JumpCloud will show how you can leverage RESTful APIs to build your own PowerShell modules to kill tickets & tabs using the PowerShell command Invoke-RestMethod.

 
al4629740Author Commented:
What I want is distinct IDs of the students that had any totals.  I tested the change and believe that my original still is the right one.

Let me know your thoughts please
0
 
5teveoCommented:
Do you want to show the detail ID# numbers and to show the counts of grouped committee and activities? Both at the same time? If yes - then these are reporting issues and not data selection issues.

What does a result record look like? provide an example.
0
 
al4629740Author Commented:
Here is what worked

SELECT r.Sector, count(Distinct r.RegID) 
                FROM tblOrgRegistrations AS r 
                      LEFT JOIN tblOrgHours AS h 
                            ON h.RegID = r.RegID 
                           AND Month(ActivityDate) = 7 And r.Board = 1 
                            LEFT JOIN tblOrgActivities AS a 
                            ON h.ActivityID = a.ActivityID And h.Hours > 0 
                     LEFT JOIN tblOrgProfile AS o 
                            ON h.AgencyID = o.AgencyID Where o.AgencyID = 74 And a.ActivityName = 'Board Meeting' 
                        Group By r.Sector order by r.Sector

Open in new window

0
 
Anthony PerkinsCommented:
That looks familiar and I am sorry to see that you still incorrectly using a LEFT JOIN.  In other words, this:
LEFT JOIN tblOrgActivities AS a ON h.ActivityID = a.ActivityID  AND h.Hours > 0
and this:
WHERE   ...
        AND a.ActivityName = 'Board Meeting'
Means that you are in fact doing an (implicit) INNER JOIN and not a LEFT JOIN.

But you can confirm this by inspecting the results and you will see that all the a.ActivityName are "Board Meeting".  If that is what you really want than you should change the LEFT JOIN to an INNER JOIN

Also, aliasing all your columns is strongly suggested (see ActivityDate), so that you are not the only one that can read the query,
0
 
al4629740Author Commented:
Can you explain further how you determined I was doing an implicit INNER JOIN from this section?

LEFT JOIN tblOrgActivities AS a ON h.ActivityID = a.ActivityID  AND h.Hours > 0
and this:
WHERE   ...
        AND a.ActivityName = 'Board Meeting'
Means that you are in fact doing an (implicit) INNER JOIN and not a LEFT JOIN.
0
 
Anthony PerkinsCommented:
Can you explain further how you determined I was doing an implicit INNER JOIN from this section?
The best way to explain this is for you to test it out for yourself.  Here is a very simple example:
DECLARE @Table1 TABLE (
		ID integer NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
		Item varchar(20))


DECLARE @Table2 TABLE (
		ID integer NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY,
		ItemType varchar(20))


INSERT	@Table1 (ID, Item)
VALUES	(1, 'Item 1'),
		(2, 'Item 2'),
		(3, 'Item 3'),
		(4, 'Item 4'),
		(5, 'Item 5'),
		(6, 'Item 6'),
		(7, 'Item 7'),
		(8, 'Item 8')

INSERT	@Table2 (ID, ItemType)
VALUES	(2, 'Item Type 1'),
		(3, 'Item Type 1'),
		(5, 'Item Type 2'),
		(8, 'Item Type 2')

-- 1
SELECT *
FROM	@Table1 t1
		INNER JOIN @Table2 t2 ON t1.ID = t2.ID
WHERE	t2.ItemType = 'Item Type 2'


-- 2 
SELECT *
FROM	@Table1 t1
		LEFT JOIN @Table2 t2 ON t1.ID = t2.ID
WHERE	t2.ItemType = 'Item Type 2'


-- 3
SELECT *
FROM	@Table1 t1
		LEFT JOIN @Table2 t2 ON t1.ID = t2.ID AND t2.ItemType = 'Item Type 2'

Open in new window


Note how the results from Query 1 and 2 are the same, even though 2 is written as an LEFT  JOIN,  If you really want a LEFT JOIN than the correct way to write it, is as Query 3.

If you are still not convinced, look at the Execution plan (press Ctrl+M before executing F5) for all three queries.  Again Query 1 and 2 are identical.  Note how they both read as Nested Loops (Inner Join) and the last one as Nested Loops (Left Outer Join) .
0

Featured Post

Free Tool: SSL Checker

Scans your site and returns information about your SSL implementation and certificate. Helpful for debugging and validating your SSL configuration.

One of a set of tools we are providing to everyone as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • +1
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now