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Find current changes in code

Posted on 2014-07-29
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Last Modified: 2014-08-04
When the Visual Studio editor is open and displaying code, any recently changed lines get a highlight on the left side of yellow or green. Is there any way to search through the code of a module to find all locations with such highlights? The best I can come up with is to use the Undo command, but then, of course, I'm wiping out my prior work; I just want to see what I've done. (I'm using VS 2008 and VB, FWIW.)
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Question by:ElrondCT
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Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger) earned 300 total points
ID: 40227363
There is nothing built in Visual Studio other than the colored markers.

The only way to see the changes you've made is to make a copy of the code file before you start editing it, and then use a file comparator tool (I use Microsoft Word for that), to compare the 2 files and locate the changes.
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by:käµfm³d 👽
käµfm³d   👽 earned 200 total points
ID: 40227522
If you were using source control (e.g. Team Foundation Server, possibly SourceSafe), then you would be able to see all of your changes since the last check-in. There is an Express edition of TFS available without cost for up to 5 developers.
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by:ElrondCT
ID: 40227773
James, Didn't realize Word had a compare feature (aside from Track Changes/Markup); I see that on the Review tab of the Ribbon now. I've got other tools of that sort which I think work better with text files. Any of them, of course, require saving the changes, but that's not a big deal. Thanks for the confirmation (that it's not available in VS) and alternative suggestion.

Kaufmed, I wasn't aware of the Express edition of TFS. I've been using VS 2008; obviously this would mean moving up to VS 2013, and I need to make sure that (and switching to Express from Professional) isn't going to mess me up. But it may be a good time to make the move.
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