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Creating Internal DNS Entry

This is going to be rough to explain. I have a customer who is using a W2K3 Standard Server and Exchange 2003. They do not have public DNS entries (no way to advertise their Exchange Server) so I went in to my hosting account and published a Host(A) record pointing to their public, static IP address. Let's call the DNS entry ES.MN.COM Now comes the fun part.

The all have iPhones and when they are in the building they connect to the local WiFi to save usage charges. When the leave the building they connect to Verizon's hot spots. So... not mater which WiFi they are connected to I need to resolve es.mn.com to their Exchange Server.

If they are using Verizon's Wifi it is a done deal. es.mn.com resolves fine. The problem I am having is making an entry in their local DNS on the server that resolves es.mn.com to the local IP address of their server.

I made up a forward lookup zone (mn.com) and added a host(a) record under it names es and pointed it to 192.168.1.4 so es.mn.com should resolve to 192.168.1.4 when they are connected to the local LAN but it is not working. es.mn.com still resolves to their Static, Public IP address as if they were connected to Verizon's Wifi.

What did I miss?
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LockDown32
Asked:
LockDown32
1 Solution
 
footechCommented:
I would verify which DNS servers are used when connected to the local WiFi.  It sounds like you created the record correctly, but you can always test from a workstation with a ping command or nslookup.  For example:
nslookup es.mn.com.
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LockDown32OwnerAuthor Commented:
Thanks footech. I did create it correctly it just didn't take hold right way. I pinged it from a workstation after half an hour and it resolved fine. Thanks for your feedback.
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