VLAN spanning multiple locations?

Quick question for you guys.  Lets say I have a LAN with two departments that are ultimately separated on their own VLANs.  A few years down the line, we open up a new campus at another location that also will house employees in those same departments.  In that scenario, would a new VLAN need to be created on the switch at the new location?  Or in other words, how would the departments communicate with eachother if not physically connected to the same switch?

Thanks in advance
blinkme323Asked:
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Joshua GrantomSenior Systems AdministratorCommented:
You can use a VPN and setup the other location on the same vlans. Depending on your configuration, you can set the vlans per port
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AkinsdNetwork AdministratorCommented:
WAN links
Check with your ISP for options. Eg private transport, Ethernet hand off, mpls etc

VPN is also considered a form of WAN link and works ok. It is secure but slow compared to others. Advantage is you don't have to buy anything extra if you already have VPN capable devices on both ends. Also, it bypasses your ISP connections and gives you total control.

Research your options
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giltjrCommented:
Well you could setup your network to span VLANs (spanning L2) across a WAN, however unless the WAN connection are high speed and low latency I would suggest against it.

What I would suggest is keep each location with their own VLAN/IP subnet and use L3 routing to route traffic between the 3 locations.

Using routing instead of spanning VLAN/L2 keeps broadcast traffic local.  When at all possible you want to keep broadcast traffic off of WAN links.
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