How can I add space to the root FS in SCO 6?

I need to add space to the root FS on a SCO 6 system. Is there an "easy" way to do this, short of making a backup, recreating the FS, and then restoring? I've included a screenshot of a dfspace command for reference. As you can see, I need to move space from /u to /. Thanks.
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sdholden28Asked:
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gheistCommented:
fsadm -b (size in 512b blocks) /mountpoint/
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mikelfritzCommented:
Where is it that you need space on "/" ?

You could copy the data to a folder on "/u" and then create a symbolic link to that directory.

For instance, if you need to plant large data in /usr/stuff - you can move what's in /usr/stuff to /u/stuff and then create a link using ln -s /usr/stuff /u/stuff

You can do things like this with many directories on the root FS - there are some you cannot.

I haven't played at all with Openserver 6 - the last ones I have are 5.0.7 and it's not possible to do it live.  In your case it looks like you would need to reduce /u before you could increase / - if it's possible at all.

Maybe a divvy output to see what the slices look like.
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mikelfritzCommented:
Sorry - the "ln" command is backwards above. ln -s /u/stuff /usr/stuff
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JJSmithCommented:
Your root (/) is fine and should really be fairly static. If for example /var is growing considerably, then I would suggest that you need to create a /var filesystem rather than grow root.

Looking at the available space in /u , I would use the fsadm command as suggested by gheist to reduce the size of /u - then use the space freed up to create more file systems.

If you want an idea on the best directories to separate out as file systems - then try:

du -sk /*

That will indicate in Kbytes the minimum required size of a file system to take a copy of the directory and sub-directories.

Once you've created the file systems you can mount them under a temporary name and move across all the files from the original top directory.

As some running process may be using some of the files that you've moved and you've only temporarily named the mount point you should finish by editing the fstab with the required file system and mountpoint names (ie the large directories you separated out) - then recycle your system.

Hope that helps
JJ



and should remain as it is. It is /u that you need to grow and as indicated by gheist, fsadm is the command for that.
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mikelfritzCommented:
Resizing looks to require two things.  First is that the FS must be vxfs, and second you need a license to enable the resizing among other things.

http://wdb1.sco.com/kb/showta?taid=126114&qid=574846049&sid=2041290973&pgnum=1

http://osr600doc.sco.com/en/FS_admin/VeritasC.overview.html

I agree with JJ that the root fs should remain relatively static.
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JJSmithCommented:
Sorry about the last line after my name in my previous comment - it's residue from a response I edited before I understood your question properly. ;-)
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sdholden28Author Commented:
Thanks for all the suggestions. In the end, this was good enough and was certainly the simplest.
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