Can my delphi XE app self-report if it was compiled 32 bit or 64 bit?

I compile a math program for both 32-bit and 64-bit platforms. Both compile to BCD-Math.exe and when I copy them to my desktop I change the names to  Math-32.exe and Math-64.exe.  More often than not I have two or more instances of either or both executing. When executed both versions look identical and I invariably forget which open app is which. I could extract the file name and add it to the caption but was wondering if there is a way for an application to determine if it was compiled as a 32-bit or 64-bit app?
Its environment's tattle-tale so to speak.

(i.e. when launched, I'd add to the title bar to indicate "32-bit"  or  "64-bit"

Thanks
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Ed CovneyRetiredAsked:
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Sinisa VukSoftware architectCommented:
you can use compile directive:

sMyVersion: String;

{$IFDEF WIN32}
  sMyVersion := 'Win32';
{$ENDIF}
{$IFDEF WIN64}
  sMyVersion := 'Win64';
{$ENDIF}

...//use then sMyVersion to set label

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Sinisa VukSoftware architectCommented:
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aikimarkCommented:
You could have two global constants (same name) wrapped in a compiler directive that conditionally compiles one or the other, based on the WIN64 compiler conditional symbol.  When your application starts, you use that global constant to display your message.
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Ed CovneyRetiredAuthor Commented:
Sinisa -  My OS Win 7 Pro is always "64-bit" whether I compile a 32-bit or 64-bit program.  I compile my program twice: one "Math.exe"  goes to  X\win32\Debug, a second compiles to  X\win32\Debug,  Then I copy both to my desktop changing the names to  Math-32.exe  and  Math-64.exe.  Once I open one by double clicking, there no indication in the program itself suggest it's the 32-bit or 64-bit version.  The code you provided correctly IDs windows as 64-bit no matter which Math-nn program is in execution.

What I'm trying to find is code that would say "I'm a 64-bit program"  or  "I'm a 32-bit program."

aikimark -  I was able to find that when I compile 32-bit programs, Delphi uses the DCC32 compiler and when I compile 64-bit programs, Delphi uses the DCC64 compiler but I could find any information on how to extract that info from a compiled program. Or am I missing something?

Thanks to both of you for trying.

- Ed
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aikimarkCommented:
X\win32\Debug
both of your compiles are going to the same directory?  The second compile will overwrite the first compile
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Ed CovneyRetiredAuthor Commented:
aikimark -

I was able to figure it out:
{$IFDEF WIN64}
  compiledVer := '(64-bit)';
{$ELSE}
  compiledVer := '(32-bit)';
{$ENDIF}

Form1.Caption := 'BCDE Math    '+compiledVer;

Thanks so much !!
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Ed CovneyRetiredAuthor Commented:
(and thanks for making me work a little - I'd never done compiler directives before - seems like they may prove useful)
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Ed CovneyRetiredAuthor Commented:
aikimark -
(oops)
 >> both of your compiles are going to the same directory?  The second compile will overwrite the first compile

No, it was a copy / paste and forgot to change 32 to 64. Given all the mistakes I make, this is likely the most common.

And thanks again for pointing me into unfamiliar but very useful territory.

- Ed
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aikimarkCommented:
I was thinking constants (see example below), but both would work.
Const
{$IFDEF WIN64}
  compiledVer = '(64-bit)';
{$ELSE}
  compiledVer = '(32-bit)';
{$ENDIF}

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Ed CovneyRetiredAuthor Commented:
Well now that you've shown me how, I'm thinking constants too !!
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