Moving SAN to new location

We’re moving our server room to a new location in the same building, the only thing changing will be the physical location. Included in the move is an FC SAN (EVA4400)  Do we just shutdown the SAN, make very careful notes where everything's attached, label leads and fibre, move EVA4400 to new location and reattach the same at new location. Is this all we need to do, we just want to be sure we don’t miss anything and it wil all work!?!?
kswan_expertAsked:
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DavidPresidentCommented:
I've found that a cell phone camera and a decent sharpie with permanent ink does nicely.   But before you move, I would do a full power-off test and startup where everything is before the move.  That way if you don't have things set up properly with persistence or have configurations that won't even boot up properly since equipment has been added, you'll catch it now.

You won't then have to deal with all those variables related to possibility of cable failures or human errors reattaching.

(Note, unplug all cables but leave them exactly where they are, so you can plug them in again, and leave equipment off long enough to make sure if you have any dead batteries in equipment, they'll be discharged).
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kswan_expertAuthor Commented:
Worked a treat!
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DavidPresidentCommented:
Great.  Glad it was smooth for you.   You might want to now take a look at all the error logs in routers, TCP/IP, disks, everything that uses networking or storage-related cables to see if error counters are high.  Could indicate a partially broken cable or connector that is slightly damaged.
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