Server 2012 iSCSI target removal

At the moment I have a windows server 2012 running Hyper-V.  On it I have a 600 GB iSCSI target which is connected to another iSCSI target on a replication (DR) server.  

I need to decommision the replication server and move to another server but I am concerned about removing the iSCSI targets on the live server.  

Is it simply a case of removing the target and then adding another one to the new server or will removing the target in some way disrupt the data?

Thanks,
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superjohnbarnesAsked:
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
You either are misusing terminology or you have done something that is *very* bad. There is a difference between an initiator and a target, and for windows these almost always be a one to one ratio. Based on your description, that isn't the case, so you are already in a situation where data corruption can occur. But in general, if you keep to a 1:1 connection between initiator and target, you can disconnect and reconnect to a new server without issue. Of course if you disconnect while an application is writing data, the application could fail or data may be inconsistent, but that is a separate issue. You'd usually stop SQL, exchange, etch before disconnecting a target to avoid that issue.
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superjohnbarnesAuthor Commented:
Hi Cliff,

You have me worried now!  Although this setup has been running well for over a year with replication of 3 virtual servers to a DR server the possibility of having the virtual disks incorrectly setup has me a little concerned.

Can you explain the 1 to 1 ratio?  Should I be using a target on the main server and just initiator on the DR server with no target or virtual disks?  I need to be able to failover to the DR server.

Thanks,

Peter
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
I dont know your network, so I can't say what *you* should do. But at any given time, only one server should be connected to a target. That's 1:1.
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superjohnbarnesAuthor Commented:
Hi Cliff,

Looking further into this it does indeed look like I have setup correctly with the 1 to 1 relationship.  But the question still remains (happy to open another)  as to which I remove.  This might be a stupid question but I would just like to make sure.  Do i remove the iSCSi virtual disk or the iSCSI target.  I am 90% sure that i will be the target.  Please see the attached.capture
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
Since your target still shows as connected, I would not remove if. I'd disconnect from the initiator end of the connection first. Then you can retire the target at your leisure.
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superjohnbarnesAuthor Commented:
Excellent.  Worked a treat. Thanks again.
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Windows Server 2012

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