Will not reset only shutdown

I have just moved a working hard drive , including the motherboard and the complete innards from one pc case to another larger case. Now it still works ok but when I need to reset the system for whatever reason it just shuts down. I have placed all the panel connectors in the same place as before. I have double checked everything with the manual. I am running Windows 7 Pro and using  an Asus Z87 pro /Gen 3 motherboard.
Laurie LongmanAsked:
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rindiCommented:
With "reset", do you mean the reset button on the case? If so, that button isn't connected to the reset connection on the mainboard.
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KimputerCommented:
The reset header is the most lower right connector (next to the power button header, which is obviously working properly). If you connected it properly, the reset button must be damaged. To check, hold the ends of the cables (the ones you would put on the headers on the motherbord), stick both ends to a volt meter, and press the reset button on the case. Select to mode on the volt meter that has something to do with this function (usually the sign that makes a connection, the display will go from 1 to 0 when the circuit is properly shorted)
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
"... but when I need to reset the system for whatever reason it just shuts down ..."  ==> Regardless of whether you're referring to a "soft" reset [i.e. Start - Shutdown - ReStart) or a "hard" reset (pushing the Reset button) ... clearly something is happening when you take that action;  so if it's a hard reset it's not a continuity problem with the switch.   [Note for Kimputer:  Continuity is measured by checking the resistance -- you set a multimeter to the Ohms function and check for zero resistance or, on some, there's a special "Continuity" function, which will produce an audible beep if there's continuity between two points.]

If you're referring to a "hard" reset, then you need to confirm that the Reset switch connections aren't "touching" the power switch connection ... this would cause the reset switch to simply mimic the power button (thus shutting the system down).    Look VERY carefully at the motherboard header to ensure all the connections are separated.    To check that there's not a short in the front panel itself, unplug both the power connection and the reset connection from the front panel header, and confirm that there's no continuity between the power switch connecting wires except when you push the power switch (i.e. NOT when you push the reset switch).    Also confirm there's no continuity between either of the power switch connecting wires and either of the reset switch connection wires.

If you're referring to a "soft" reset, try replacing the CMOS battery (small CR2032 on the motherboard).    The CMOS may not be "remembering" the reset flag.
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Laurie LongmanAuthor Commented:
I'm sorry but I omitted to say that when I start from a cold boot I get a message  over clocking failed, then it continues to the desktop and everything is hunky dory again. That is the pc works perfectly again.
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
Are you in fact overclocking the system?    If so, DON'T  (you'll find it's much more reliable).

If not, then you almost certainly have a defective BIOS battery, and the CMOS isn't retaining the settings.   Replace the battery; and then select the "fail safe defaults" for the BIOS settings.
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nobusCommented:
normally  - it is a CR2032 and should read 3 V min
you can test it or replace it, it cost only about a dollar
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Laurie LongmanAuthor Commented:
Great help originally did not give this a thought.
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
nobus ==> FYI notice the "... If you're referring to a "soft" reset, try replacing the CMOS battery (small CR2032 on the motherboard).    The CMOS may not be "remembering" the reset flag. " 

Posted yesterday (a day before your comment :-)
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Hardware/Desktops/Q_28497425.html#a40261192
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Gary CaseRetiredCommented:
... and followed up with this on the same day after further feedback:    ".... you almost certainly have a defective BIOS battery, and the CMOS isn't retaining the settings.   Replace the battery; and then select the "fail safe defaults" for the BIOS settings."
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nobusCommented:
then Gary should get the points -  at least partial
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