How to find the CPU cores in virtual server ?

I have windows 2008r2 VM. How to find the CPU cores in VM ?

I  tried the command msinfo32. But it does not show the actual cores.
Varshini SAsked:
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nick2253Commented:
Are you trying to see how many cores are allocated to a VM from within that VM?  This is the command that should work for you. Just run from the command line:

WMIC CPU Get DeviceID,NumberOfCores,NumberOfLogicalProcessors

If that's not what you're looking for, please clarify the question.

Cheers!
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Brad GrouxSenior Manager (Wintel Engineering)Commented:
Right-click the task bar and open Task Manager. Under the "Performance" tab you will see the CPU cores under "CPU history." Each CPU box is one CPU core.
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Matt VCommented:
Running task manager will tell you how many virtual cores you have.  There will be a column for each core.
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i486dx266Senior DevOps ConsultantCommented:
Hi,

You can use the following command on cmd or powershell:

 wmic cpu get NumberOfCores
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Varshini SAuthor Commented:
nick2253,

I am using the VM and it has 1 core and 1 logical processor. But my friend is saying it has 1 CPU with  8 cores.
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Brad GrouxSenior Manager (Wintel Engineering)Commented:
If Task Manager or PowerShell is only showing 1 core - then Windows only sees 1 core and is only utilizing 1 core. Depending on how the Virtual Machine is configured on the host is how Windows is able to access to assigned cores.
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Seth SimmonsSr. Systems AdministratorCommented:
I am using the VM and it has 1 core and 1 logical processor.

where are you seeing that?
if in task manager, make sure you are viewing one graph per cpu else the average of all the cores will appear in one graph
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nick2253Commented:
I am using the VM and it has 1 core and 1 logical processor. But my friend is saying it has 1 CPU with  8 cores.
Then Windows only has access to one core.  Your friend is mistaken.

Perhaps, your friend is saying that your hypervisor has 8 cores, but for VM only has one.  Or, your friend may believe he has configured your VM to have 8 cores, but did so incorrectly (didn't commit his changes, for example).

Nevertheless, your 2008 server VM has one, and only one, core accessible to it.
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Varshini SAuthor Commented:
Seth Simmons,

In Task manager  one graph per CPU was grayed out
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nick2253Commented:
In Task manager  one graph per CPU was grayed out
This is going to require a screenshot, because I don't know that I've ever seen anything like this before.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
The host server MAY have 1 cpu and 8 cores - but the Virtualization platform obscures that.  What virtualization platform are you using?  VMWare?  Hyper-V?  Xen?  Something else?  As far as I know, you CANNOT directly determine the number of cores from the VM under any platform.  You have to check on the host server.
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Varshini SAuthor Commented:
Using VMWare
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
Workstation or ESXi?

You MAY be able to get it connecting with the vSphere client... otherwise, consult your system documentation (reciept/watch the boot and look up the CPU)/manufacturer.
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Varshini SAuthor Commented:
ESXi
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
You won't likely be able to tell using the ESXi server itself and the guests won't have a clue either.  You'll have to reboot and get the CPU model, use third party boot disk to determine, check what the server was ordered with, or MAYBE the vSphere client will tell you if you look at the server information (I avoid VMWare).
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nick2253Commented:
Of course you can tell via ESXi or the vSphere client!  What leads you to believe that you wouldn't?

The easiest way is to create a VM and boot the CPUID Iso: http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=1031785

That will tell you info about the underlying CPU on the ESXi box.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
> What leads you to believe that you wouldn't?
The fact that I don't use VMWare regularly and the console is utter cr*p that won't let you do anything even via a command line.  Like I said, "I avoid VMWare" so MAYBE is the best I'm going to offer.  Glad you could clarify.
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Seth SimmonsSr. Systems AdministratorCommented:
...that won't let you do anything even via a command line

there are a lot of things you can do with the command line through powercli

https://www.vmware.com/support/developer/PowerCLI/
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