Error 43 USB Drive

Anyway to fix error =
Windows has stopped this device because it has reported problems. (Code 43)

Tried Kingston USB Drive on 2nd computer , same error
Tried on different USB Port (2 on front , 1 on back) , same error


Any fix?
Thanks
LVL 4
mvalencia2003Asked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

rindiCommented:
Is it a USB stick or a rotating external HD? With actual HD's, the manufacturer's diagnostic utility can sometimes help. If it is solid state (USB stick or SSD) usually there isn't much that can be done, except replace the device with a new one.
0
dbruntonCommented:
Probably not.   Seems dead to me.

You could try it on a system that has a USB 1 port (that's the lowest common speed) and see if it can be read there.  If it fails there I'd consider it dead.

Or you could try formatting it if Windows permits that operation.  You'd lose all data if it does.  But I consider the drive dead anyway.
0
mvalencia2003Author Commented:
USB Flash Drive , Kingston -

NOT SSD or Spinning HD
0
Hey MSSPs! What's your total cost of ownership?

WEBINAR: Managed security service providers often deploy & manage products from a variety of solution vendors. But is this really the best approach when it comes to saving time AND money? Join us on Aug. 15th to learn how you can improve your total cost of ownership today!

rindiCommented:
As I mentioned, when sticks go bad, you can't repair them. In some rare cases you might be able to recover some data using testdisk or photorec, but as data is never kept on a single location anyway that isn't necessary...
0
mvalencia2003Author Commented:
What is reason they go bad?  any way to prevent ,
?


Thanks
0
rindiCommented:
All disks (rotating and solid state, and USB sticks etc) go bad. You can't prevent that. USB sticks in particular aren't built to last very long, they are cheap, so why bother?

What you can do, is to always use the safely remove option, not to bump into them when you walk close to the stick that protrudes out of the USB port (knocking into them that way can destroy the port or the stick mechanically), and just make sure you have a good backup strategy.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
mvalencia2003Author Commented:
Thanks
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Windows 7

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.

Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.