Best way to add to existing network

I currently have a DSL modem that connects to a Netgear 16 port Gigabyte unmanaged switch in room 1 of my house. I would like to add a few more computers to room 2. I do have the ability to run a network cable from one room to the other. The easiest way would be for me to run one cable from room 1 to room 2 and connect it to another switch. I'm not sure if this is the best method or not, at least regarding performance. I would like to hear other opinions for this type of setup. my ultimate goal is to isolate my network from a guest network. I realize I will probably have to replace the Netgear switch in order to do that.


Thanks,
Mike
aintgot1Asked:
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Today, a very good way, in my opinion, is to place Wireless routers (1 or 2) at strategic locations and connect these back to the central network with Ethernet.

You can keep them on the main network, or give them a separate subnet and isolate them. Either way, you are responsible for your guests' usage.

I keep my wireless on my main network and have responsible guests.
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aintgot1Author Commented:
Today, a very good way, in my opinion, is to place Wireless routers (1 or 2) at strategic locations and connect these back to the central network with Ethernet.
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That was an option that came across my mind as well, but I would like to avoid the wireless. I feel that it is not as secure as a wired network but would leave that option open as a last resort.


Thanks,
Mike
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
I secure my wireless very strongly and have no security issues. I have a good N card in my laptop and get close to wired speeds through my main router.

However, wired Ethernet is also good and if you can get it to all appropriate areas, it will serve you well. I did this myself before wireless became common and I have networking in strategic locations in my home.

If you want to segregate wired Ethernet, you need a switch that will do VLAN's.  You also need to run segregated wiring to locations where you need it.

You could put VLAN switches in a few locations but this adds complexity.

I like highly secured wireless because it is flexible and somewhat more easily segregated. I am assuming your guests a reasonable and not hackers.
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aintgot1Author Commented:
I guess I'm just a little bit paranoid on the wireless issue. I'm not up to speed on security, especially with packet capturing programs. I should clarify what I mean by guests. There are not any real guests that visit that I would worry about. My only concern would be my son's computer. He plays games sometimes online and that is my only issue. I would put him on a guest network. That is what the VLAN would do for me. I would like to have my computers on a separate network because I have computers that I use for testing and training that I need to protect if that makes any difference. I agree wireless would be flexible, just can't seem to go that route yet. Evaluating other options to compare against.


Thanks,
Mike
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Today's wireless security is very good. Also don't forget that you and your guests and family will have smart phones and tablets with no wired network capability. You will have to provide wireless (or not provide visitors with needed access). So then now is the time to learn secure wireless.
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aintgot1Author Commented:
I'm definitely going to keep that option open because it does have some advantages over running wires.
How do you protect against packet sniffers though? That is something I would be concerned about, even though I don't see my neighbors having the need or knowledge of doing that.


Thanks,
Mike
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Good packet sniffers can see packets, true. I use CommView and have done for years. So I do know about them.

On the other hand, neighbours need to be physically closed. Wi-Fi loses strength fairly quickly over distance. My signal does not reach to neighbours properties.

You can turn off broadcasting. That makes a bit more inconvenient to attach to and will not in any way stop a determined hacker. But casual users will not see your network if it is not broadcasting the SSID.
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
Thank you, Mike, and I was happy to help. Good luck with your network; I am sure it will work well for you.
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