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Linux RAID-10 Volume Missing

I have a home/SMB NAS device from a manufacturer I will not name. The 5 disk system was originally built with RAID-10 with 1 hotspare. Being a Linux novice, I assumed when I built it and created the RAID-10 volume, that it was built properly through the GUI and I would be protected.

Recently, 1 drive failed, and a second went into a 'failing' state in the GUI. I replaced the failed disk in drive 1, then thinking it would be rebuilt, and the hotspare had done it's job, I replaced the second 'failing' hard drive. At that time, the RAID-10 volume went missing.

# cat /proc/mdstat
Personalities : [linear] [raid0] [raid1] [raid10] [raid6] [raid5] [raid4] [multipath]
md256 : active raid1 sdg2[4](S) sdd2[3] sdc2[2](S) sdb2[1]
                 530112 blocks super 1.0 [2/2] [UU]
                 bitmap: 0/1 pages [0KB], 65536KB chunk

md13 : active raid1 sdg4[0] sdb4[1] sdd4[3] sdc4[2]
                 458880 blocks [5/4] [UUUU_]
                 bitmap: 48/57 pages [192KB], 4KB chunk

md9 : active raid1 sdg1[0] sdb1[1] sdd1[3] sdc1[2]
                 530048 blocks [5/4] [UUUU_]
                 bitmap: 34/65 pages [136KB], 4KB chunk

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# fdisk -l

Disk /dev/sdb: 3000.5 GB, 3000592982016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 364801 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdb1               1      267350  2147483647+  ee  EFI GPT

Disk /dev/sdc: 3000.5 GB, 3000592982016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 364801 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdc1               1      267350  2147483647+  ee  EFI GPT

Disk /dev/sdd: 3000.5 GB, 3000592982016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 364801 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdd1               1      267350  2147483647+  ee  EFI GPT

Disk /dev/sdf: 515 MB, 515899392 bytes
8 heads, 32 sectors/track, 3936 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 256 * 512 = 131072 bytes

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdf1               1          17        2160   83  Linux
/dev/sdf2   *          18        1910      242304   83  Linux
/dev/sdf3            1911        3803      242304   83  Linux
/dev/sdf4            3804        3936       17024    5  Extended
/dev/sdf5            3804        3868        8304   83  Linux
/dev/sdf6            3869        3936        8688   83  Linux

Disk /dev/md9: 542 MB, 542769152 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, 132512 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8 * 512 = 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/md9 doesn't contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/md13: 469 MB, 469893120 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, 114720 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8 * 512 = 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/md13 doesn't contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/md256: 542 MB, 542834688 bytes
2 heads, 4 sectors/track, 132528 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 8 * 512 = 4096 bytes

Disk /dev/md256 doesn't contain a valid partition table

Disk /dev/sda: 3000.5 GB, 3000592982016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 364801 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sda1               1      267350  2147483647+  ee  EFI GPT

Disk /dev/sdg: 3000.5 GB, 3000592982016 bytes
255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 364801 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdg1               1      267350  2147483647+  ee  EFI GPT

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As I do not know anything about Linux, I am afraid to continue and am looking for guidance to try and recover the data.

Prior to starting any recovery efforts, this is what things looked like after the drive failure:

Filesystem Size Used Available Use% Mounted on
/dev/ram0 151.1M 136.9M 14.2M 91% /
devtmpfs 488.0M 4.0k 488.0M 0% /dev
tmpfs 64.0M 320.0k 63.7M 0% /tmp
/dev/md9 509.5M 111.8M 397.7M 22% /mnt/HDA_ROOT
/dev/md0 5.4T 802.2G 4.6T 14% /share/MD0_DATA
/dev/md13 371.0M 253.8M 117.2M 68% /mnt/ext
tmpfs 32.0M 1.6M 30.4M 5% /.eaccelerator.tmp
Mount Status:
/proc on /proc type proc (rw)
devpts on /dev/pts type devpts (rw)
sysfs on /sys type sysfs (rw)
tmpfs on /tmp type tmpfs (rw,size=64M)
none on /proc/bus/usb type usbfs (rw)
/dev/md9 on /mnt/HDA_ROOT type ext3 (rw,data=ordered)
/dev/md0 on /share/MD0_DATA type ext4 (ro,usrjquota=aquota.user,jqfmt=vfsv0,user_xattr,data=ordered,delalloc,acl)
/dev/md13 on /mnt/ext type ext3 (rw,data=ordered)
tmpfs on /.eaccelerator.tmp type tmpfs (rw,size=32M)
RAID Status:
Personalities : [linear] [raid0] [raid1] [raid10] [raid6] [raid5] [raid4] [multipath] 
md0 : active raid10 sdb3[5](F) sde3[3] sdd3[4] sdc3[2]
	5857395072 blocks super 1.0 64K chunks 2 near-copies [4/3] [U_UU]

md256 : active raid1 sdg2[5](S) sde2[4] sdd2[3] sdc2[2](S)
	530112 blocks super 1.0 [2/2] [UU]
	bitmap: 0/1 pages [0KB], 65536KB chunk

md13 : active raid1 sdg4[1] sde4[0] sdd4[3] sdc4[2]
	458880 blocks [5/4] [UUUU_]
	bitmap: 6/57 pages [24KB], 4KB chunk

md9 : active raid1 sdg1[1] sde1[0] sdd1[3] sdc1[2]
	530048 blocks [5/4] [UUUU_]
	bitmap: 32/65 pages [128KB], 4KB chunk

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0
pcteamadmin
Asked:
pcteamadmin
  • 2
1 Solution
 
nociSoftware EngineerCommented:
One thing you can try is put back the "Failed" drive. It might still work sufficiently to recover.

Also you can check progress of a replication process by
cat /proc/mdstat

which will give you the stats of all activity.
0
 
pcteamadminAuthor Commented:
I was actually able to force the drives back into a raid-10 volume, then force mounted it to get the data off.
0
 
pcteamadminAuthor Commented:
solved it myself
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