Compare and select printer model

Is there any website for comparing all printer model? For example, I'd like to have a color laser printer of resolution of 1200x 2400 dpi and wanna list all printers suit this requirement for my selection.
litmicAsked:
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Chris Berry1st Line Technical SupportCommented:
I'm not 100% sure there is a set website for this.

I know if you go a site that sells printers most have the option to do a refined search on things like DPI etc.
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hdhondtCommented:
There is no website to compare "all" printer models. Some websites publish reviews of some printers. Examples are:

www.pcmag.com/reviews/laser-printers
printers.toptenreviews.com/laser/
www.cnet.com/au/topics/printers/best-printers/laser-printers/

Companies that sell printers may have comparisons, but only between the models they sell. Some printer manufacturers also compare their printer with competitors - to show how much worse the competition is. For example:

http://www.office.xerox.com/perl-bin/product.pl?mode=competition&category=BW_PRINTERS

Also, as far as I know there is no laser printer with 1200 x 2400 dpi. Most lasers run at 600, a few go up to 1200 x 1200. Any figures higher than that relate to "perceived resolution". They intend to show what the resolution of a conventional printing press should be, in order to print the same range of halftones. In other words, it shows how good the printer's halftoning algorithms are, not it's actual resolution. The toptenreviews website I mentioned lists the Xerox ColorQube as a 2400 x 2400 dpi printer. Don't let them fool you, it isn't. The data sheet says: "Standard 525 x 450 dpi, Maximum: 2400 dpi FinePoint". The word Finepoint is the clincher here, it does not refer to real dpi.
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