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format disk SQL 64K and performance issue

Posted on 2014-09-03
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Last Modified: 2014-09-25
Hello,

How can I check if disk is formatted 64K?
If not, how can I do it?

Thanks
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Question by:bibi92
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Expert Comment

by:Randy Knight, MCM
ID: 40302063
This article written by one of my colleagues may help. It also discusses partition alignment which you should look at as well.

http://www.sqlsolutionsgroup.com/improve-io-performance/
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by:Seth Simmons
ID: 40302189
How can I check if disk is formatted 64K?

open an elevated command prompt and type diskpart
type list volume and it will show all the volumes; find the volume number by the drive letter you want to check
type select volume x (replace x with the actual volume number)
type filesystems and it will show the allocation size

If not, how can I do it?

the volume will need to be formatted which means you will have to backup any data on that volume first
when you format the drive (right-click on the drive in explorer and select format), change the allocation unit size to 64k in the options

format
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by:bibi92
ID: 40302440
Thanks but is it possible to align volume disk.
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by:Randy Knight, MCM
ID: 40302443
I'm not sure I understand the question.
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by:bibi92
ID: 40302465
Several volumes have been created on the same disk. Is it possible to align a volume and format each to 64 k. Thanks regards
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Randy Knight, MCM earned 500 total points
ID: 40302469
Interesting question.  I don't think I've ever tried.  Formatting your logical volumes to 64K should be easy but I'm not certain on the partition alignment.   My guess is it would destroy all the volumes.  

Realistically, if your partitions and volumes were created in Server 2008 or higher, you're probably fine.  But it's worth running the commands in the article to know for sure.
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