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DDN saving problem from MS Office apps

We have a network share on DDN hardware and we have a reproducible problem where users can't save from within MS Office apps to the share, while they can save from windows explorer or file explorer.  Some of our users use the MSO save or open dialog boxes to move files around, but they can no no longer do this with the DDN share.  We had a share on a windows 2003 R2 server that worked fine.  Users are using their Active Directory credentials to authenticate against the share.

This happens on windows computers using windows xp/7/8.x.

I am not the admin of the share equipment, but I will get more information about it.  The admins are currently speaking with the vendors to try to fix the problem, but is there another solution?  Why us this happening in the first place?

All of my users who are experiencing this authenticate against another DC before having the share mapped.
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Thomas Zucker-Scharff
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Thomas Zucker-Scharff
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Thomas Zucker-ScharffSystems AnalystAuthor Commented:
I found this error when trying to save to the shared drive The file size is 0kb. The full path is:

Z:\Shared Files - Cancer Center\Cancer Center\Grants\! CCSG\CCSG-41 Noncompete May 2014\CCSG Development Funds Tracking\02 Tumor Microenvironment & Metastasis\PostDoc Ad for Condeelis Oktay final (7-10-14).docx.

Screen capture of file share error when saving from MS Word 2010
Also if I go just one directory up it saves fine.  Might it be the windows path name is to long?  If so, why doesn't it say that - I do get that error sometimes.

It does let me save to the directory one up and then do a move from within a word open dialog box to the next directory down.
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Thomas Zucker-ScharffSystems AnalystAuthor Commented:
Still no solution to this problem.  I have investigated further.  I am still baffled by why I get this file permission error instead of the error that states the path is too long (if that is indeed the problem).  If the path/filename combination is indeed too long (although it is 211 characters), why does Windows Explorer allow it and Microsoft Office does not?  In this case MSO does allow path/filenames under 200 characters, but why?  Is there some limit I don't know about?  Is the error message generated like a normal windoze error message - it means nothing about what is actually the problem?

The information below was gleaned from this page on SharePoint, but was informative nonetheless:

260 Unicode (UTF-16) code units – the characters in a full file path, not including a domain/server name.
256 Unicode (UTF-16) code units – the characters in a full folder path, not including the file name and the domain/server name.
128 Unicode (UTF-16) code units - characters in a path component, that is, a file or folder name.
260 Unicode (UTF-16) code units – the characters in a full path, including a domain/server name for use with Office clients.
256 Unicode (UTF-16) code units – the characters in a full path including the domain/server name, for use with Active X controls.

That article led me to this one: http://word.tips.net/T006397_Limits_on_Path_Length_in_Word.html

That was somewhat helpful, but I already knew what it said.  The next article I found was more interesting: http://cybertext.wordpress.com/2013/01/29/windows-file-path-character-limit/ and I decided to try the tool referenced there Long-Path-Tool.  Although I am reticent to try this, since changing the file/path names will cause a lot of unrest, LPT found literally 1000's of files on our server share with a combined pathname/filename over 200 characters.  LPT combined with mapping to a subfolder of the share (shortens to path) will be my solution.
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Thomas Zucker-ScharffSystems AnalystAuthor Commented:
Since I received no feedback whatsoever, I did more research and wrote the previous post as an answer.
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