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Invisible files in vsphere datastore

vSphere 5.5 and BackupExec 2013 with vmware backup license

I regularly back up VMs from vsphere using backupexec and recently I tried a test restore.  I didn't want to touch any working VMs so I created a new folder and in the restore job changed the path to that folder.  The job ran and showed 90gb of data transfered.

Back on the esxi server, I saw the datastore freespace shrink by 90gb, but the folder I chose as the destination (and which was verified as the destination in the backupexec logs) was completely EMPTY.

I searched everywhere on the datastore but couldn't find the files restored from tape.  I also used veeam backup file tool, to search the datastore (besides the browse datastore in vsphere client).

Finally I deleted the target test-restore folder and it deleted immediately, but the free space on my datastore is still 90gb less than when I began.

How can I clean up these invisible files and where are they?

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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
The files must be somewhere on the datastore ?

Are you sure if did not restore to the original folder ?
gateguardAuthor Commented:
I'm not sure of anything other than backupexec said it restored 90gb of files to the path on the datastore I designated and the datastore has indeed 90gb less free space than before.

is there some kind of database store cleanup utility?
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
there is no database store cleanup utility.

But there is a script which can check for orphaned Virtual Machines. part of the

VMware Community Pack
http://www.virtu-al.net/featured-scripts/vmware-powerpack/ - list orpahned virtualk disks, e.g. virtual disks, which are not associated with a VM.

Does Backup Exec Register VMs with the Inventory? Have you checked your Inventory - Discovered Virtual Machines, to see it's not registered a new VM ?

I would recommend using the following, also VMware recommends the use of PowerCLI, which is PowerShell interface with vSphere-specific additions.


One of the simplest PowerCLI examples, and something which is actually extremely useful on its own, is the Get-VM cmdlet. Which lists VMs.

PowerCLI can be a bit overwhelming to use,  But it can be enhanced with a nice toolset and a library of preconfigured scripts to jump-start your mass changes, which is possible with PowerGUI



VMware Community Pack
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