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SImple Ubuntu server incremental backup help

Posted on 2014-09-06
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Last Modified: 2014-09-07
I am trying to pull a backup from an Ubuntu server using ssh. I understand that it is not a good practice to enable the root user and passwordless ssh to the server root account.
Instead I should create a create a user with limited scope. How do I do that and still be able to copy all the files in /etc/, etc (which I imagine are readable only by root)?
I guess I could make a user and put him in the group "root," but wouldn't that defeat the purpose?

Thank you.
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Question by:Jeff swicegood
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Steve Bink earned 500 total points
ID: 40308318
Create a user specifically for this copy.  Also, create a "backupcopy" group, and make sure your new user is part of it.  Create a cron job, run as root, to collect all the information you need and tar it.  The cron job should chown the tar file to root:backupcopy, and chmod 640.  It should also place the tar somewhere the new user can read.  Use the new user's credentials to pull the tar to your backup server.

Finally, make sure your cron job has some basic file management.  Delete the old files as soon as you know they are safe on the remote server.
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by:Jeff swicegood
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Thank you. I see that this will work.
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