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How to resize a partition on centOS 6.3 (VMware VM on ESX)?

Posted on 2014-09-08
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Last Modified: 2014-09-08
I need to expand the partition (main) on a centOS 6.3 VM, it is also a virtual machine running on ESX 5.1. I have increased the file storage successfully within VMware ESX, but need the steps to increase the size within the operating system.

Here is the specs:

df -h
vmware view
centOS 6.3
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Question by:meade470
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8 Comments
 
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by:mbertl
mbertl earned 200 total points
ID: 40309877
You mostly would do that with:

lvm pvresize --setphysicalvolumesize <size> <physicalvolume>

and then

lvm lvresize --size + <size> <logicalvolume>
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by:Sandy
Sandy earned 300 total points
ID: 40309891
1. Check the disk in OS with fdisk -l
2. Create a physical partition of required size and change the type to "Linux LVM"
3. Create the PV of newly created FS #pvcreate /dev/sdxx
4. Extend the vg by PV size so the space can be used in LV resize #vgextend <vg> <pv>
5. Resize the LV #lvextend -L+<size>G <lv>
6. perform online resizing #resize2fs <lv>
7. Verify with #lvs and #df -h

TY/SA
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Author Comment

by:meade470
ID: 40309925
Can you please expand on some of your answers Sandy?

2. Create a physical partition of required size and change the type to "Linux LVM"
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by:Sandy
Sandy earned 300 total points
ID: 40309931
#fdisk /dev/sdxx

Press "n"

Press "p"

Press "1"

Select start and end cylinder(size)

then use the system id to modify the FS type by pressing "t" and then type code : 8e

Press "w"

TY/SA
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Author Comment

by:meade470
ID: 40309936
Also, could i use gParted in pre-environment to make the changes?
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Accepted Solution

by:
Sandy earned 300 total points
ID: 40309981
you can, i would not suggest..

TY/SA
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Assisted Solution

by:mbertl
mbertl earned 200 total points
ID: 40310033
What do you mean with 'pre-environment'? If you mean, booting with a Live system like Part Image: yes, i'd do it that way.
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Author Closing Comment

by:meade470
ID: 40310039
Thanks - using gParted
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