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Fiber Optic lines between Smart Switches

Hi,

I subcontract to a company when they need me. They have not needed any help for a year. Point being someone else has been doing work at an adjoining company, and for the last couple months part of this company has had no internet going to it. So they called me in to look.

the main switch is a linksys, it has 4 small ports on the right for fiber, the other ones around the company are cisco, they have 2 wide ports for fiber on right side. (forgive me, i'm not there if you need to I will copy down the part numbers).

One of the fibers was not lighting up on the linksys, I tracked it down to it's corresponding cisco. I checked out where the cable went. There is a panel with each outlying section labeled. The port for the section I was looking for was unplugged, and the fiber plugged into a different port. I' pretty sure the other company did it because they were in this cabinet. (don't ask me why).

The problem is this... I plugged the proper port into the proper cable, and it still does not light up. I traced the cable with a laser pointer and I get light coming out on both sides. I've switched the linksys ports around, and switched them back, and used other wires keeping track of what was where originally. The problem does not seem to be the metal insert that the fiber plugs into. I don't know about the cisco side because I have no spare plugs, but I'm trying to get some.

All is back the way it was currently. How come the switches won't connect? What sources can I go to, to understand more?
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StarThunder
Asked:
StarThunder
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2 Solutions
 
pergrCommented:
Did it used to work?

If it never worked, it is possible that the optics in the Cisco and Linksys use different wavelenght - which typically is for different fiber.

With multimode fiber, you need to use multimode patch leads (usually orange or agq/green), and optic modules for 850nm.

With singlemode fiber, you need to use singlemode patch leads (usually yellow), and optic modules for 1310nm.
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Syed_M_UsmanCommented:
Dear,
try swapping fiber cable connectors (fiber patch cord) on one side.

best regards,
Syed.
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StarThunderAuthor Commented:
Yes the connection did used to work, what's frustrating is I'm coming behind someone not knowing what they may have done.

Thanks for the fiber and frequency info. I'll let you know how how it goes.
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pergrCommented:
You can also do loop tests. The two fibers are transmit and receive. Instead of patching from optics module to patch panel, you can patch from transmit port directly to the receive port on the module. If the port comes up you know the module is ok. Next you move on to the remote site, and patch the transmit port on the patch panel directly to the receive port on the patch panel, and do on.

Obviously it require patch leads with the same type of connectors st both ends.
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StarThunderAuthor Commented:
Finally found out the answer, The Module on the Cisco side was bad. We didn't have a 2nd to try. We got one and tried it and it worked! Thanks for all the help! It would appear I am going to be working with Fiber a lot more, and the suggestions I got will help me in the future, I'm sure. Thanks.
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