Subquery vs Join

Can someone please explain why these produce different results:

SELECT s1.category_ID
FROM
	 (SELECT TOP(10) *
	  FROM tblRequestLines) s1
	  

SELECT s1.category_id
FROM tblRequestLines s1
	INNER JOIN 
		(SELECT
		 TOP(10) * 
		 FROM tblRequestLines) s2
	ON s1.ID = s2.ID

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LVL 12
James ElliottManaging DirectorAsked:
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Vitor MontalvãoMSSQL Senior EngineerCommented:
Because you don't have an ORDER BY clause.
TOP and BOTTOM keywords should work always with an ORDER BY clause otherwise you have the risk to get different results as you could saw by your own experience.
0
Guy Hengel [angelIII / a3]Billing EngineerCommented:
that's the main reason, but also that with the JOIN, if the ID has "duplicates", it will do a cross-tab of the results...
0
James ElliottManaging DirectorAuthor Commented:
In terms of solution, then the Order By clause has solved my problem, but it doesn't really explain why the results are different. Surely they should be the same?


SELECT TOP(10) * FROM Table

ColumnA ---- ColumnB
1                       10
2                       9
3                       8
4                       7
5                       6
6                       5
7                       4
8                       3
9                       2
10                     1

SELECT s1.ColumnB FROM (SELECT TOP(10) * FROM Table) s1

I expect to give me

10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1

but instead, gives me

1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10

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Does the primary query modify the execution of the bracketed subquery?
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Vitor MontalvãoMSSQL Senior EngineerCommented:
It will try to return records sorted by a clustered index. If no clustered index is found, I think it will sort by the first column in the SELECT clause and by default in Ascending order.
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Guy Hengel [angelIII / a3]Billing EngineerCommented:
unless you specify ORDER BY, a query will never have any guaranteed "order".
neither the order of insertion, nor the order of the values nor any other order.
in practice, the DBMS engine will choose some "execution plan", and starts to fetch the data from the data pages behind.
it may even return data from pages that are (still) in memory, to avoid the disk reads...
0

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James ElliottManaging DirectorAuthor Commented:
Thanks both
0
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