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Network slowness after decommissioning SBS 2003

We recently demoted and decommissioned a Windows Small Business Server 2003 box that was previously an Exchange and PDC. We now have three Windows Server 2008 R2 VMs as domain controllers and have raised our forest/domain functional levels to Windows Server 2008 R2. After turning off the SBS 2003 server, we received complaints of network slowness (opening files, browsing). Powering on the SBS 2003 server resolved the issue, so there must be something still pointing to it. So far we have done the following to no avail:

 * Updated the folder redirection group policy to point to the new file server and unchecked the option to "move contents of documents to the new location"
 * Disabled DNS and WINS services on the SBS 2003
 * Ensured all devices are using active domain controllers for DNS
 * Disabled offline files
 * Ensured client devices do not have any network drives or printers mapped to the old server
 * Checked the "ShellFolders" registry key under HKCU and HKLM, and nothing is pointing to the old server

Despite the above, it appears some clients are still pointing to the old server for some reason:

 * Under Computer Management -> Shared Folders -> Sessions, I see a couple client PCs that are connected to the server for "Windows" type sessions. However, there is nothing listed as open under Shared Folders -> Open Files. Most of the "Windows" type sessions only stay open for a few seconds every so often.
 * If I use TCPView from Sysinternals, I see a few clients connected under the "microsoft-ds" Local Port. I logged in to one such client and didn't see any open applications, nor were there any network drives or printers pointing to the old server. Most of these "microsoft-ds" sessions only stay open for a few seconds periodically and then close.

Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks in advance!
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brainsurf1
Asked:
brainsurf1
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1 Solution
 
David AtkinIT ProfessionalCommented:
Hello,

Is this a brand new domain or have the new servers been added as domain controllers?  If so, have you transferred the FSMO roles?
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James HIT DirectorCommented:
Definitely sounds like the roles have not been transferred over.

http://www.petri.com/determining_fsmo_role_holders.htm#

Use this link as there are screenshots of how to check which server has the roles and how to change them.

Let us know if you have any further issues.
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brainsurf1Author Commented:
This is not a brand new domain. The roles have absolutely been transferred over. Dcdiag runs successfully without any failures on all domain controllers, and this is reflected in DNS and through ADUC.
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David AtkinIT ProfessionalCommented:
Ok.  Double check Group Policy to ensure that non of the existing policies are referring to the old SBS.

AV questions:

With regards to Anti-Virus, what do you use?  Has it ever been installed via a console on the old SBS or using it as an update source?  Is it updating correctly? New mapped drives been excluded?
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brainsurf1Author Commented:
Thanks David for your assistance. We've checked all of our GPOs a few times and cannot find any trace of the old server. We use LANDesk Anti-Virus and have a core server on our (not the customer's) network that provides updates.  I have also uninstalled all non-essential software on the old server, so there is nothing except Windows components running anymore.
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David AtkinIT ProfessionalCommented:
With the SBS2003 machine on, can you see any sessions active or anything?

You could try using processmon on one of the client machines to whats happening with the machine when its freezing.
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brainsurf1Author Commented:
David, there are several "Windows" type sessions open, but there are no open files.
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Joshua GrantomSenior EngineerCommented:
has your DHCP Server Options been updated to make sure that the SBS 2003 server is no longer an auto assigned DNS server?
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brainsurf1Author Commented:
Joshua, yes, the only authorized DHCP servers are active domain controllers.
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Joshua GrantomSenior EngineerCommented:
im not talking about authorized DHCP lists. Im referring to your DHCP Scope Options under the DHCP scope and DHCP Server Options

dhcp.jpg
Once the DHCP server options are checked I would suggest everyone having slowness issues perform an ipconfig /flushdns to remove the old server from DNS on client side
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brainsurf1Author Commented:
Joshua, the old server is not listed for any DHCP server/scope option.
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Joshua GrantomSenior EngineerCommented:
ipconfig /flushdns

or

ipconfig /renew
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Neil RussellTechnical Development LeadCommented:
Run wireshark on a few of the affected PC's and run a full packet trace. Inspect and search for all traffic going TO and FROM the old SBS box. This should enable you to tell exactly what traffic is bound for it and why.

Also you could try running a copy of WhatsRunning on the PC's and looking at the network traffic and then what process owns each connection.

Also you could do

NETSTAT -abn

in a command window on the workstations, this will show what executable is talking to your SBS box too.
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brainsurf1Author Commented:
"NETSTAT -abn" is showing the SYSTEM process (PID 4) is talking  to the old SBS.

I am seeing the IPC$ share on the old server has a couple sessions open, and these close/open periodically.
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Joshua GrantomSenior EngineerCommented:
shutdown the old SBS server and flush the dns on all clients, this should close all connection and keep the SYSTEM from trying to reconnect to any shares on the old server.
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brainsurf1Author Commented:
I've requested that this question be deleted for the following reason:

Delete
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Neil RussellTechnical Development LeadCommented:
Delete why?
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