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  • Status: Solved
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Index out of range error on datagridview?

I'm getting an "Index out of range error on a datagridview and not sure why. I'm assigning a datasource to it that contains 4 rows with 8 columns. I've attached a screenshot of my debugging session. I execute "BL.GetLoadData" to load the DataSet. EH is an instance of an Error Handling class.
Screenshot.jpg
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BlakeMcKenna
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BlakeMcKenna
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1 Solution
 
Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger)PresidentCommented:
Have you verified that your table has columns before setting it as the DataSource.

Somebody had a similar problem a few days ago, and they found out that it was setting the grid to Nothing before changing its DataSource suddenly started to cause problems.
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BlakeMcKennaAuthor Commented:
Yes, it has 8 columns and 4 rows of data...
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BlakeMcKennaAuthor Commented:
I wanted to say that the Columns for this dgv are built in the designer and not thru the SQL Query.
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BlakeMcKennaAuthor Commented:
James,

I just checked mine and it's nothing as well but what do I need to do if it's being built as a result of a SQL Query? As I mentioned above, I build the Grid Columns in designer mode. The DataNameProperty is empty!
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Jacques Bourgeois (James Burger)PresidentCommented:
Ooops. An interesting new piece of information there. If the columns are built in the designer, then you probably lose them when you set the DataSource to Nothing.

Instead of doing so, simply call Clear on the grid. This removes the old data but should keep the formatting.

Nowadays, I use something else than the DataGridView. But when I did, I never liked the designer and preferred setting the format through my code. Setting the DataSource then automatically creates the columns, all that is left is to format them. It took more time, but since I had complete control and often needed to add things that the designer could not do anyway, I found it to be worth the trouble.

Here is an example, where dgvComponent is the grid and _componentList is the source of data:
		With dgvComponents

			.IsInitializing = True
			.DataSource = Nothing
			.DataSource = _componentsList

			.RowHeadersWidthSizeMode = DataGridViewRowHeadersWidthSizeMode.DisableResizing
			.RowHeadersWidth = 15

			'Columns that need to be hidden
			.Columns("ProjectID").Visible = False
			.Columns("ID").Visible = False
			.Columns("HasChanged").Visible = False
			.Columns("NumberOfParts").Visible = False

			'Setup of the remaining columns
			With .Columns("Quantity")
				.HeaderText = "Qt"
				.ToolTipText = My.Resources.TltQuantity
				.DisplayIndex = 0
				.DefaultCellStyle.Alignment = DataGridViewContentAlignment.MiddleCenter
				.AutoSizeMode = DataGridViewAutoSizeColumnMode.None
				.Width = 30
			End With

			'And so on....

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BlakeMcKennaAuthor Commented:
Thanks James...that worked perfect! There wasn't much I had to do but that "Clear" Method worked great!
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