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PHP Syntax

Posted on 2014-09-11
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Last Modified: 2014-09-11
How do I properly write the following:
<?php
if ((isset ($_POST['bike_state']) && $_POST['bike_state'] != '17') || (isset ($_POST['bike_state']) && $_POST['bike_state'] != '22') || (isset ($_POST['bike_state']) && $_POST['bike_state'] != '31'))  { }
?>

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Question by:rgranlund
5 Comments
 
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Expert Comment

by:Dave Baldwin
ID: 40317617
What's wrong with what you have?  Is there an error message?
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Tom Beck earned 500 total points
ID: 40317628
You should check to see if it's set before checking its value.
if (isset ($_POST['bike_state'])) {
	if ($_POST['bike_state'] != '17' && $_POST['bike_state'] != '22' && $_POST['bike_state'] != '31') {
	}
}

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Expert Comment

by:yodercm
ID: 40317706
The logic you are using will always succeed.  You have

if (
(isset ($_POST['bike_state']) && $_POST['bike_state'] != '17') ||
(isset ($_POST['bike_state']) && $_POST['bike_state'] != '22') ||
(isset ($_POST['bike_state']) && $_POST['bike_state'] != '31')
)  { }

If the value is 17 then it's not 22 and so the OR will succeed.
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LVL 27

Expert Comment

by:yodercm
ID: 40317714
If what you actually intend is to succeed if the value is set and is any value other than 17, 22, or 31, then you need to use:

if (
(isset ($_POST['bike_state']) &&
$_POST['bike_state'] != '17') &&
$_POST['bike_state'] != '22') &&
$_POST['bike_state'] != '31')
)  { }

This will succeed on 13, but fail on 17, 22, and 31.
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LVL 109

Expert Comment

by:Ray Paseur
ID: 40317885
You might want to learn about switch/case control structures.  For things like this it's a much more reasonable way to write the conditional statements.
http://www.php.net/manual/en/control-structures.switch.php
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