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Ancient computer with cassette player as drive

Posted on 2014-09-11
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Last Modified: 2014-09-13
I'm trying to remember the first computer I had when I was very young.  Couldn't remember the name or manufacture.  I wonder if someone knows without disclosing the age :)

Somewhere back in mid to late 80s I had a 'computer' that was basically a thick keyboard.  The cassette player was serving as a data input drive.  Keyboard had a input DIN connector to plug in the player.  I had to find cassettes with different programs.  Mostly primitive games.
I had to always turn the volume all the way down.  Otherwise it would produce that squealing noise from the program when cassette playing.

That same keyboard had some loose wires that I learned how to connect (solder) to the vacuum tube TV and later to the transistor semiconductor TVs.  So I was able to get B/W picture and later color as well.

Up to this point I couldn't remember what was it.  I do remember other parents buying it and asking me to connect to their televisions.

Anyone remember or recall anything like this?
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Question by:Tiras25
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by:aleghart
aleghart earned 63 total points
ID: 40318580
Never had to solder anything, but I had a TI-99/4a.  Used cartridges to load programs.  Had BASIC programming, which used a cassette deck to record and load programs.

TI-99/4Ahttp://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas_Instruments_TI-99/4A
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by:_
_ earned 125 total points
ID: 40318616
I started to say Atari, but they didn't use a Din.
Maybe a Sinclair or Amstrad?

Here is a list of old 8-bits:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_8-bit_computer_hardware_palettes
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by:Dave Baldwin
Dave Baldwin earned 63 total points
ID: 40318623
I used a SOL-20 for while: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Processor_Technology  It had a 'full' 64K of ram, a B&W TV monitor, and a cassette drive for 'storage'.  The 'fun' thing was that if I bumped the computer a little too hard... it reset itself and I lost everything that I was working on.  Happened several times.
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by:Dave Baldwin
ID: 40318625
Or maybe you're thinking of the Sinclair ZX81: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZX81
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by:_
_ earned 125 total points
ID: 40318626
Might take a few minutes to dig through, but this site has pics:
http://www.obsoletecomputermuseum.org/
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by:☠ MASQ ☠
☠ MASQ ☠ earned 62 total points
ID: 40318633
As a home PC either a Dragon
Dragon 32
Or Commodore
Commodore C64 drive
But really depends on your vintage and location at the time.  And as someone whose first computer loaded its software from paper tape I take exception to the term "Ancient" :)
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by:viki2000
viki2000 earned 62 total points
ID: 40318668
I had one too, was very expensive at that time.
My father did not like because I used his TV to learn my first programming language: BASIC, 2 thick books.
This was mine:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZX_Spectrum
But I do not think it has a DIN connector...
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by:rindi
rindi earned 62 total points
ID: 40318822
It sounds just like the Commodore PET:

Commodore PET
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commodore_PET

My teacher was very proud of having one and showed it off in class.
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by:
speed_54 earned 63 total points
ID: 40318935
Commodore VIC-20 or Amstrad CPC-464

Amstrad CPC 464
VIC 20
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by:Tiras25
ID: 40321021
Thanks guys.  Still not sure exactly but all look very similar.  I'll dig through it later.
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by:_
ID: 40321311
Thank you much.
Enjoy your walk down memory lane. I did.     : )
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