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fios internet setup

just had fios box installed at pub.  would like to set up a free wifi that will be separate from my business.  what is the best way to do this?  was thinking to run one Ethernet to a sonicwall device and on the other side of the sonic wall set up the internal network of point of sale machine and office computers (not even sure how to do that).  can I also run a separate Ethernet from fios box to a wireless router for public?  what then if I want wifi for my office as well (not the public).   thanks in advance.  
ps  I guess id love to see a diagram of how to set up this network I speak of and some layman term instructions :-)
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StewartGilligan
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StewartGilligan
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2 Solutions
 
Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
I wouldn't recommend Sonicwall since I bought one and it failed to work out of the box but they refused to provide any form of assistance even for an essentially DOA device without purchasing a support contract.

I would recommend a Netgear router - I have installed WN203 at clients and very much like the ease of setup and EXCELLENT support at no additional charge as well as lifetime warranty. http://www.netgear.com/business/products/wireless/business-wireless/wn203.aspx
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carlmdCommented:
Depending upon the size of your pub, a wireless Sonicwall may be all that you need. You can get a wireless TZ105 with one year of subscriptions for $421. The Sonicwall wall has a browser based interface and uses wizards to help you set up most things. In your case you could, assuming your business use is wired internet you can easily set up a zone for each use. For example your lan on one, your internal wireless use on another, and free patron wifi on another. The wired  zone can be totally separate from the others, or allow access from your internal wireless, while the patron wifi is totally isolated from this.

Here is some info on the Sonicwall:

http://www.sonicguard.com/TZ105Wireless.asp

There are lots of videos on youtube you can watch to get an idea of what is involved.

http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=sonicwall+tz+105+setup
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Bryant SchaperCommented:
I am not sure if the sonic wall supports it, but if it can broadcast multiple SSID's you can associate one to customers and the other for business, and still use wired for the business too.  I would always recommend Cisco and Ruckus for routing and wireless, but it really comes down to budget and desire to learn the setup.  The small cisco 819 is a wireless router and around $600
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
The netgear I sugggested supports up to 8 SSIDs. and is 1/4 the price of the Sonicwall with support.
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Bryant SchaperCommented:
That works too, not really a netgear fan myself.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
When your budget allows you to use Cisco and Ruckus, great... MOST people in small business don't have those kinds of budgets... at least that I've worked with.
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Bryant SchaperCommented:
Lee, tend to agree, but I find the argument circular, Worked and consulted for large and small businesses.  Some companies just don't want to pay, others are happy replacing the same hardware every year or so when they fail, others want don't want to and pay up front.  Even the business grade netgears are upwards of $400

I don't disagree with  netgear, certainly would with lower quality wireless though.  It is one thing for a home, but if you are placing it in a business and have 30 users, the enterprise hardware will fair surpass a netgear device, the technology is so different, in the higher end space.  A lot goes into wireless planning, and so much of it is how you use your radio space and bandwidth, the lower end stuff does not do very well, they are designed for low density deployments.

It comes down to the service you want to offer.  You tell me you are pub and running your POS online, then I say get better gear, or wait until it fails then decide how often you can do without.  Point of Sales are lifeblood to an establishment and mission critical.  I have installed many over the years, and did cost-benefit analysis' on then as well.  They are tricky beasts in some cases, and needs change over time.
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StewartGilliganAuthor Commented:
so if I choose one of the above routers, what is the layout of how to set up an internal network after the router and a public wireless after the fios box but before the router?  thanks
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Bryant SchaperCommented:
The design would be after the router, it would go fios box to router at the router you would separate out two secure lans that do not talk to each other.  If you added the AP before the router, it could potentially take all the bandwidth unless you put some controls in place to prevent it.  After the router you have full control and can shape bandwidth as needed.
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StewartGilliganAuthor Commented:
is it possible to have a wireless network that is part of the internal network and another that is for public only?
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carlmdCommented:
You last comment can be accomplished with the Sonicwall. Basically it is set up using zones, defining what the guest verses the employees can do. You can also assign how much bandwidth each can use if you need to do that as well.
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StewartGilliganAuthor Commented:
thank you all for the input.  im not comfortable assigning points but its part of the deal.  I based it on the actual question (not which router is preferred) thinking of someone reading the question and looking for an answer to it. thanks again :-)
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