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Spell Check in Access 2013 subform

I'm using the code below to spell a field in a subform, it fails at .SelStart = 0, it does pull the characters from the text field for checking. It works in the main form.

If Len(Me!Text14 & "") > 0 Then
        With Me!Text14
            .SetFocus
            .SelStart = 0
            .SelLength = Len(Me!Text14)
        End With
        DoCmd.SetWarnings False
        DoCmd.RunCommand acCmdSpelling
        DoCmd.SetWarnings True
    End If
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dgravitt
Asked:
dgravitt
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1 Solution
 
Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
Are you certain Text14 is the name of the Textbox (more on that later)? If so, you might try this:

If Len(Me.Text14 & "") > 0 Then
        With Me.Text14
            .SetFocus
            .SelStart = 0
            .SelLength = Len(Me.Text14)
        End With
        DoCmd.SetWarnings False
        DoCmd.RunCommand acCmdSpelling
        DoCmd.SetWarnings True
    End If

Open in new window

Basically, I've changed the ! to a . instead. Better yet, change the name of that Textbox to something meaningful, like "txCustomerName", and you will be sure that you're referring to the correct value.

Also, regarding Subforms - is this code running in the Mainform, or in the Subform? If it's running in the Mainform, and if you're trying to execute it against objects in the Subform, you'll have to change the textbox reference.

Regarding nameing: You really, really, really should adopt a Nameing Convention for your programming. There are several concepts out there, but essentially you should give meaningful names to all objects, and you should preface those names with a 1 to 3 character tag that indicates the "type" of object they are. For example, "txCustomerName" indicates the control holds the Customer's Name, and that it's most likely a textbox. "cboCustomerType" would indicate the control holds the Type of Customer, and is most likely a Combobox. Doesn't really matter what sort of nomenclature you use, so long as you're consistent, and it makes sense to you.
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dgravittAuthor Commented:
I changed the ! to a .  Still fails at the same point. I included a stop in the code so I could verify the the value being checked is correct. I am checking in the subform. The way I have this setup is, I have an "entry" section in the header. When all fields are filled in, the user clicks add, and then it show in the list in the Detail section. I'm Spell Checking a field in the header on exit from the field.
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
So is the code you're showing running in an event on the MAIN form, or on the SUBform?

If it's on the MAIN form, then you'll have to refer to the controls on the SUBform differently. For example, if Text14 is on the SUBForm, and you're running the code on the MAIN form:

If Len(Me.YourSubformCONTROL.Form!Text14 & "") > 0 Then
        With Me.YourSubformCONTROL.Form!Text14
            .SetFocus
            .SelStart = 0
            .SelLength = Len(Me.YourSubformCONTROL.Form.Text14)
        End With
        DoCmd.SetWarnings False
        DoCmd.RunCommand acCmdSpelling
        DoCmd.SetWarnings True
    End If

Open in new window

Note that YourSubformCONTROL is the Subform Control on the main form, and may or may not be named the same as the Form you're using as a Subform. To get the name of the control, click ONCE in the subform, then look at the Properties of the object. It should say "Subform/Subreport" in the Properties sheet.

Subform
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dgravittAuthor Commented:
Yes, it is running in the subform. I tried the above and get an error on finding the field. Does it matter that this is an unbound field? As stated previously, when I run it the way it was with a Stop in the code, I can verify that it has captured the data in the text box, it just doesn't process it.
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dgravittAuthor Commented:
this is a shot of my form(s). I'm trying to check the desription field at top of the subform.
screen.jpg
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
Does it matter that this is an unbound field?
It might.

When you use SelStart and SelLength, does the text in that control get the Focus, and is it highlighted?
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dgravittAuthor Commented:
That is where the error happens is on SelStart. Sorry, but I must ask about your Icon, is that South Carolina?
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dgravittAuthor Commented:
OK, it is the unbound field. When I move it down to the Detail part and set it on the description field it works. How can I make it check on the add record? I tried it on After Update, but that doesn't work in insert.
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dgravittAuthor Commented:
Got it. I added the check spelling to event procedure after running the insert. I'm going to give you credit because your answers where very thought provoking.
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dgravittAuthor Commented:
Thanks for working through this.
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE )Infotrakker SoftwareCommented:
Thanks - and yes, my avatar is the traditional Block C logo for the mighty South Carolina Gamecocks!!!
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dgravittAuthor Commented:
I will be a huge Gamecock fan this weekend. I'm GA Tech. Thanks again for your help.
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