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Excel VBA RENAME SQL COLUMN

Posted on 2014-09-15
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Last Modified: 2014-09-21
Hi

I am trying to rename a SQL Column in Excel VBA using the following statement but it says incorrect syntax

 sSQL = "ALTER TABLE [BANK] RENAME COLUMN [ACOUNT] to [ACCOUNT]"
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Question by:Murray Brown
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9 Comments
 
LVL 27

Expert Comment

by:MacroShadow
ID: 40324716
The syntax seems to be correct. Try
sSQL = "ALTER TABLE BANK RENAME COLUMN ACOUNT to ACCOUNT;"
0
 
LVL 49

Expert Comment

by:PortletPaul
ID: 40324732
believe you need to use sp_rename

EXEC sp_rename
    @objname = 'BANK.ACOUNT ',
    @newname = 'ACCOUNT',
    @objtype = 'COLUMN'
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LVL 66

Expert Comment

by:Jim Horn
ID: 40325445
Playing with fire, we are...
0
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LVL 27

Expert Comment

by:MacroShadow
ID: 40325465
Let's hope this is the beginning of the developing....
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Author Comment

by:Murray Brown
ID: 40325955
Hi MacroShadow I get the error Incorrect syntax near 'RENAME'.
0
 
LVL 49

Expert Comment

by:PortletPaul
ID: 40326880
I am NOT aware of RENAME being available in TSQL. Refer to the documentation page for ALTER TABLE
Try using the browser's search (ctrl f) for "rename"

The syntax is not correct for SQL Server
(it might be for MySQL for example)

Consider the following which you can try yourself here: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!3/414b0/1
CREATE TABLE BANK
     ([ID] int identity primary key
     
     , [ACOUNT] int                  --<< incorrect spelling
    );

INSERT INTO BANK 	([ACOUNT])
VALUES 	(10),	(20),	(30);

                                      --<< fix the spelling!

EXEC sp_rename @objname = 'BANK.ACOUNT ', @newname = 'ACCOUNT', @objtype = 'COLUMN';

Open in new window

-- note the column heading
SELECT * FROM BANK;


-- now try this syntax:
ALTER TABLE BANK RENAME COLUMN ACCOUNT to ACOUNT;

Open in new window

| ID | ACCOUNT |
|----|---------|
|  1 |      10 |
|  2 |      20 |
|  3 |      30 |
		
Incorrect syntax near 'RENAME'.: -- now try this syntax:
ALTER TABLE BANK RENAME COLUMN ACCOUNT to ACOUNT

Open in new window

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LVL 27

Accepted Solution

by:
MacroShadow earned 500 total points
ID: 40327165
0
 
LVL 49

Expert Comment

by:PortletPaul
ID: 40327175
That reference is for "generic SQL" NOT T-SQL (which  is the MS SQL Server dialect of SQL)

Microsoft do not own the term "SQL" although I do know many folk will just use that term when referring to "Microsoft SQL Server" so it's easy to get this wrong when out of context.

The definitive reference for T-SQL is "Books On-Line" (BOL)
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Author Closing Comment

by:Murray Brown
ID: 40335303
Thanks very much
0

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