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identify last boot up time for a virtual machine on a esxi 4.1 cluster

Posted on 2014-09-16
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Last Modified: 2014-09-16
Hi all,

trying to remove redundant VMs from the 4.1 ESXi cluster but would like to know if there is anyway of identifying the last start-up date for VMs that are currently powered off? This would assist in my recommendation to delete them from disk. I have looked on Google but can't see anything that helps.
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Question by:Jason Thomas
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE) earned 500 total points
ID: 40325067
In each VM folder there is a

1. VMX file check the date on the VMX file.

2.Also check the vmware.log file which will certainly include details of last start up.
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by:Jason Thomas
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Spot-on. Thank you.
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