Is there a realistic chance that I won't be able to view my VideoReDo files in 10 years time? Just because I can't find a 'video converter' that can convert these files?

Let's assume I used VideoReDo to edit some of my videos (in MPEG-2). What are the chances that in 10 years time I won't be able to find a 'video converter' (such as 'AVS Video Converter') that will convert these MPEG-2's to play on the newest devices. Is there a chance that in 10 years time I won't be able to find a 'video converter' that can convert these MPEG-2 files created by VideoReDo to play on the newest TVs,  iPads or iPods?

http://www.videoredo.com/en/Compare.htm

Many thanks in advance,

HA
H AAsked:
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TobiasHolmCommented:
I think the risk is very slim, as good as zero, that you won't be able to play/convert MPEG2-files in ten years. If, in the future, you discover the new players ain't capable of playing your MPEG-files, you could then convert your files to the future format that looks like the most supported videoformat at the time.

Even today it's possible to read VHS or Video8 tapes if you buy a second hand player on eBay and transfer the movies to MPEG-files.

I'd worry more about the media you put the MPEG-files on, than about the video format itself. DVD-discs is not a good option today. Better with external USB-harddrives (but be sure to save at least double copies of all your video files). It can also be a good idéa to store the files at a NAS far away from your house (a private NAS at a friends/relatives house, or encrypted in a cloud service).

/Tobias
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dbruntonCommented:
Unlikely.

MPEG-2 is a standard.  See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MPEG-2  Everyone uses and supports it.

You'll still be able to convert it back to AVI (another standard) and then reconvert it to the format you want if you need to.  AVI is pretty much a base for a lot of video work and that isn't going to go away.  Converters to go from MPEG-2 to AVI aren't going to go away either.

So if you can't find a converter to go from MPEG-2 to <fancy new format>  you'll be able to go back to AVI and then convert from AVI to <fancy new format>.
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H AAuthor Commented:
Thanks a lot to both of you!  I was just getting a bit worried about using VideoReDo because of this quote from Tobias from another thread:

"VideoReDo can cut without reencoding, but sometimes the resulting videofiles can be unplayable on some videoplayers."
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