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Migrating User Profile and/or Programdata to separate partition

Posted on 2014-09-18
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We currently run a terminal server farm with 5 2008 R2 terminal servers.  Each server is configured the same.  I am currently working on modifying an existing gpo involving our folder redirection.  Users desktops, my documents, pictures, and favorites folders are currently redirected to a share on a different server.  I am working on removing this and setting all redirected folders back to the original userprofile location.  This being C:\Users.  However in doing so, I need to move the user profile location off of the C: drive and onto the E: drive due to free space limitations.  I am aware of the settings that need to be changed in the registry.  In addition removing users profiles and having them recreated is not a problem, so I don't really need to move existing user profiles from C: to E:, but just the default profile location.  See below for details:  In addition, we currently use office365 with exchange hosted on the cloud.  All users use outlook (2013) in online mode, with no cached mailboxes setup.  I am going to change this and start setting up cached copies of each persons mailbox (.ost) in their userprofile location.

RAID-1
C: & D: partitions
C: Most software installed here.
D: Office installed here.

RAID-5
E: partition and virtually unused.


Naturally, the userprofiles location is in the standard spot at C:\Users, and the programdata location is at C:\programdata.

1)  From a performance standpoint, if I move the userprofile location from C:\Users to E:\Users, should I move the programdata location from c:\programdata to e:\programdata?   Should user profiles and the programdata folders be on the same partition?

2)  If I only move the userprofiles from C:\Users to E:\Users will I take a hit in performance if I leave C:\programdata where it currently is?  Will I see a performance gain?

3)  I have ready that modifying these locations post installation can cause some updates, service packs, etc to not install or work.  Thoughts on this?

Again, I get how to do all of this, I am just trying to decide which locations would be best.  Thanks in advance for your help.
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Question by:spadmin1
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rhandels earned 2000 total points
ID: 40332067
1)  From a performance standpoint, if I move the userprofile location from C:\Users to E:\Users, should I move the programdata location from c:\programdata to e:\programdata?   Should user profiles and the programdata folders be on the same partition?

No, there is no need to do this. We also have a terminal server and have profiles on D and Programdata on C. I would suggest leaving it that way (Programdata that is) because some applications hardcode the path inthere whereas the user profile mostly  is referred to as %PROFILEPATH% or %APPDATA%,

2)  If I only move the userprofiles from C:\Users to E:\Users will I take a hit in performance if I leave C:\programdata where it currently is?  Will I see a performance gain?

It depends. It will only give a performance difference (not even hit but could also be better) if there are different physical disks inthere. Also if you have that, also the RAID configuration will be crucial.

3)  I have ready that modifying these locations post installation can cause some updates, service packs, etc to not install or work.  Thoughts on this?

See answer 1. We haven'1 had 1 issue after moving the profiles to a different location. We did this way after installing the server. We do however use Vdisks for our Citrix servers that's why we change the path (out of the vdisk for performance).


I would suggest adding the policy (if you don't have it allready) to remove roaming profiles after logoff. This ensures that old profiles will bne removed.

Also, if you have a profile allready on the server it will stay in the location were it was created (in your case being c:\users). Also the administrator profile will stay there.. SO don't remove the folder after the change.
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