AIX add static route

How to add a static route in AIX using a command line     -     10.29.17.0 /20 gateway 10.39.225.5
Ramu ShettyAsked:
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woolmilkporcCommented:
route add -net 10.29.17.0 -netmask 255.255.240.0 10.39.225.5

Please note that there must be an interface which can reach the gateway's network!
Note, too, that this route will not survive the next reboot.

To make it permanent use "smitty mkroute". This is the preferred method.

Alternatetively you can use "chdev" to change inet0:

chdev -l inet0 -a route=net,,-netmask,255.255.240.0,10.29.17.0,10.39.225.5
mkdev -l inet0
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Ramu ShettyAuthor Commented:
Thanks WMP, Why are we using mkdev command after adding the route using chdev...
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woolmilkporcCommented:
That's to make sure that the changes are indeed applied to the device. In older AIX versions "mkdev" was mandatory, in newer AIXes "chdev" will try to update the ODM as well as to apply the changes to the device  (if the device supports it).

Which is your AIX version? If it's 5.3 or up you can omit "mkdev".

Consider using "smitty mkroute". You'll be always on the safe side.
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Ramu ShettyAuthor Commented:
Hello wmp,
My version or AIX is 6.1 TL9, So looks like I can omit.

Thanks for all your help...
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Ramu ShettyAuthor Commented:
ALso on one of the blogs I found this command, there is a -static in the command...

--> chdev -l inet0 -a route=net,-netmask,255.255.240.0,-static, 10.29.17.0, 10.39.225.5

Please let me know if this also works...
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woolmilkporcCommented:
You don't need it for "-a route=..."

"-static" identifies a manually added route, and only "-a delroute=..." might (possibly) need a distinction between "-static" and "-nostatic". The latter identifies routes added by the kernel or special routing daemon methods.

The command you posted in your last comment will work, of course - but only if you eliminate the spaces after "-static," and "10.29.17.0," !

And to anticipate your question for "-hopcount": This parameter is only needed to prioritize routes going to the same destination. It's the same as "cost" in some network technology dialects. So if there's just one route to a given destination "-hopcount" is not required.
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fuad abdullaCommented:
This is absolutely a perfect Blog.
I would like to know where I could see my permanent routes present. In linux, /etc/rc.local will list the static routes.

On my AIX server, I see a couple of routes on netstat -rn command. However, how can I confirm if they will be present after the next reboot?
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