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Virtual machine boots into BSOD

Posted on 2014-09-20
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Last Modified: 2014-09-22
I have a new notebook computer with Windows 7 64-bit.  I prefer to use other operating systems, so I created a vmx file from the physical disc in my old laptop.  It has 3 operating systems:  two of them are Windows XP Professional and one is Windows 7 Professional 32-bit.  VMWare Converter was used to create the vmx file, which contains three volumes with these operating systems.  Using VMPlayer, all of the systems boot into a BSOD with STOP: 0x00000007B.  

I have never used a virtual machine before, and feel awkward trying to work with it.  I can't even seem to select "safe mode" during the reboot process.  The keyboard and mouse seem to have no effect on the boot menu. At any rate, I'd appreciate some guidance on how to remedy the BSOD.
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Question by:ddantes
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Assisted Solution

by:Paul S
Paul S earned 200 total points
ID: 40334987
Stop Error 7B means the disk controller driver is missing or not included in the critical driver database for earlier loading during OS boot. normally VMware converter solves this during conversion or as a separate task.

- try telling vmware convert to fix this as a separate task. normally called "reconfigure VM"
- try changing the disk controller type in VMware player. try combinations until it works.

also, read this:

VMware KB: Virtual machine fails to boot with a blue diagnostic screen stating: 7B Stop Code after using VMware Converter
http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=2002106
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Author Comment

by:ddantes
ID: 40334993
Thank you for your comment. In VMConverter, I have the window open for customizing reconfiguration.  There is a warning: Unable to locate the required sysprep files.  Not sure where to go from here.
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by:Paul S
ID: 40334995
I would ignore the warning and continue if possible. I don't normally provide sysprep files and it works for me.
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by:Paul S
ID: 40334997
if you can't continue....

this article says sysprep files are built into Window 7.

VMware KB: Sysprep file locations and versions
http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?language=en_US&cmd=displayKC&externalId=1005593

maybe your windows 7 host installation is corrupt?
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Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 40335255
VMWare Converter was used to create the vmx file, which contains three volumes with these operating systems.

Just to be clear, you have 3 folders and each folder has a VMX and a VMDK file (and some others). They are all separate. There is not one VMX file for all 3 machines.

Open VMware Player and point to one of the machines. BEFORE starting the machine, see if you can go to VM, Manage, and Change Hardware Compatibility. See if you can change it to a newer level and see if that helps. This works in VMware Workstation, and I do not know if it works in VMware Player.
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Author Comment

by:ddantes
ID: 40335401
Thanks to both Experts.  There is only one vmx file and it contains three volumes.  The installations are not corrupt, since they run normally on the old laptop.  Unless they became corrupt during the conversion process.
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Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 40335404
You should move that VMX file into a secure backup location, then separate your 3 machines into 3 folders, and then make a new VMX file for EACH machine. Once done, try upgrading hardware and see if you can open one.  ONE VMX file per machine, please.
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Author Comment

by:ddantes
ID: 40335417
OK.  This will take more than a day, and I will post again.  Meanwhile, can you provide some specific instruction on upgrading hardware?  Perhaps I could try that first, in case it helps.
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by:John Hurst
ID: 40335423
As I noted for VMWare Workstation, VM, Manage allows you to change hardware compatibility. It is a VMWare function and I have used a change in hardware to resurrect a machine not working properly with respect to hardware.

If you are trying to learn VMWare, you will be much better off with Workststion rather than Player.
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Author Comment

by:ddantes
ID: 40335431
Thank you.  I have a trial version of VMware Workstation.  But I don't know what hardware should be changed, or what to change it to.
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Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 40335435
VMWare supplies hardware. Look at the level in the Manage section and if you can change up level, please try.

I would not do this until you separate machines into folders, each with its own VMX file.
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Author Comment

by:ddantes
ID: 40335449
Understood.  Please stand by while the VMX files are created, tested, and re-configured...
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Expert Comment

by:Paul S
ID: 40335979
did you have a multi-boot menu on the original hardware for selecting which OS to boot? do you still get that on the VM?

Did you try my suggestion of changing the disk controller type?
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Expert Comment

by:Paul S
ID: 40335981
this article might be relevant too

VMware KB: Injecting SCSI controller device drivers into Windows when it fails to boot after converting it with VMware Converter
http://kb.vmware.com/selfservice/microsites/search.do?cmd=displayKC&docType=kc&docTypeID=DT_KB_1_1&externalId=1005208
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Author Comment

by:ddantes
ID: 40337088
There was a multi-boot menu on the original disc and on the VM.  I have yet to try changing the disc controller.  It is already set as SCSI.  When I created a VMX file with only a single operating system, the VM booted without a BSOD.  However, after a few minutes of working with the machine, a blue screen appeared.
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Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 40337109
Did you try ONE VMX file for ONE machine and change the hardware level?  What happened.
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Author Comment

by:ddantes
ID: 40337163
Yes, a new VMX file was created with only a single operating system.  The hardware was already set at the highest level.  It booted OK but a BSOD developed after a few minutes.  I even tried lower settings of hardware, but it didn't help.
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Accepted Solution

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John Hurst earned 300 total points
ID: 40337179
Are you sure the VMDK is OK?  It sounds like it is damaged somehow.

If you can run it long enough, try running System File Checker (SFC /SCANNOW) and see if that helps.
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Author Comment

by:ddantes
ID: 40337380
SFC reported corrupt files which were successfully repaired.  I'll see what happens with the VM now and post again.  On start-up, several devices could not be connected because adapters don't exist on the host (parallel and serial ports and an SCSI CD drive).
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Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 40337500
Thanks for trying SFC and keep us posted with results.
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Author Closing Comment

by:ddantes
ID: 40337521
The VM seems to be working now.  Thanks to both Experts.
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Expert Comment

by:John Hurst
ID: 40337694
@ddantes  - Thanks for the update and I was happy to help. I am glad all is well.
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