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powershell datetime parse help

Hello EE,

I have a a creation date in string format from gwmi win32_process , it returns a date format that is unusual , how do I parse this correctly, as the nano seconds after the seconds does not have a character format that I am aware of ?

20140913014133.145231+000

 {[datetime]::ParseExact($_.CreationDate,????? ,$null)}
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davesnb
Asked:
davesnb
2 Solutions
 
Dale HarrisProfessional Services EngineerCommented:
Does this work for you?

[DateTime]::ParseExact($_.CreationDate.substring(0,14),'yyyyMMddhhmmss',$null)
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becraigCommented:
You can also just split the date (though the substring should work as well)

 [DateTime]::ParseExact(($_creationDate.split(".")[0]), 'yyyyMMddHHmmss', $null)

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davesnbAuthor Commented:
Works great, thank you
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Dale HarrisProfessional Services EngineerCommented:
You need to be careful not to use the HH since it needs to be in 12 hour format, not 24 in order for it to properly parse.  But yes, either way whether you split it or substring it should work just fine.
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QlemoC++ DeveloperCommented:
Usually that is a sufficient way to convert WMI Dates, but the "officially correct" way is to use this:
[ManagementDateTimeConverter]::ToDateTime($_.creationDate)

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This allows for adjustment of time zone info, which can get important if you use a remote WMI query.
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footechCommented:
I know the question is already answered, but was just going through my email alerts.
The other way that I've always seen is to use the ConvertToDateTime method that is added to all WMI objects returned by PowerShell.  Quick example.
$a = gwmi win32_process -filter "name = 'svchost.exe'"
$a | % { $_.ConvertToDateTime($_.CreationDate) }

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