dfs - distributed file system replication folder question

I have setup DFS replication on both DC at same physical location. ex: share1 on dc1 (primary) replicates to share1 on dc2. both DCs are name server. if both DCs are both on. How do I know exactly which server I am accessing? as it could be either dc1 or dc2
okamonAsked:
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
Short answer, you don't of both replication targets are also DFS Namespace targets. And, in fact, that would defeat the purpose of DFS-N. If they are on the same physical server and, in fact in most cases at the same site, I see almost no benefit to such a topology. DFS-R is not meant to be a replacement for failover clustering. They serve two different purposes and there is little overlap.
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Joshua GrantomSenior Systems AdministratorCommented:
If you right click on a shared folder that is in a DFS namespace and go to the DFS tab, it will actually tell you which server path is active.
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okamonAuthor Commented:
the purpose we setup the replication is to use the dc2 as a backup. so if the dc1 is down we can quickly switch to it. what is the problem of doing this? of course, we are also doing a full server backup to external device.

my plan is to change it as one way replication, so only dc1 replicates to dc2, not 2 way.
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
You can do what you want if only one DFS namespace target is enabled. In the event of a failure, you'd have to manually enable the other target. Rather kludgy. If both are enabled, you can't control which reference gets handed out, and conflicts will inevitably occur because file locks do *not* occur at the DFS level. DFS-R isn't one-way, but by disabling a target, you can ensure changes are only happening on one server and would effectively only need to travel one way. But as mentioned above, that requires manual intervention in a failure. So doable? Yes. Is it a cluster replacement? Not even close. Which is what it sounds like you are trying to create.
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Windows Server 2008

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