Question about my network configuration

Hi,

My network is structured with one Juniper Firewall + one D-Link switch.

About the switch it's a 24 slots 1Gb with 3 virtual lan :
Office / Technical Office / Server

Each vlan is on a separate network (....0.X for office , ...42.X for technical...etc)

My firewall has a wan output which is logic and 5 lan output (Office/Technical Office / Server and 2 no use).
Firewall is the gateway for all device and the 3 ports are of course connected to the switch.

Now i have a computer A and a computer B a computer C and a computer D on the same network "Technical office"
If i transfer a file from A to B and in the same time from C to D what is the max bandwith?
1Gb for both? 1Gb in total?
Is the Juniper limiting to 1 GB on a same network or only if i transfer file from different network?

Thanks
thibault LeboucqAsked:
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Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
If i transfer a file from A to B and in the same time from C to D what is the max bandwith?
1Gb for both? 1Gb in total?

Is the Juniper limiting to 1 GB on a same network or only if i transfer file from different network?

The Juniper is only a factor if traffic is moving between different networks.

If the traffic is between devices on the same network then the backplane speed of the switch is the limiting factor.
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thibault LeboucqAuthor Commented:
Perfect ! So can you confirm me that if i change my switch for a 10 Gb one, then all device on the same network will get this speed except if i transfer a file from network office to network technical office.
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Don JohnstonInstructorCommented:
No, I can't confirm that.  ;-)

The speed between two devices will depend not just on the speed of the ports on the switch but also the backplane speed of the switch.  What you're looking for would be a switch that has a backplane which is at least the speed of the sum of all the ports.  i.e. a 24-port 10g switch would need a backplane speed of 240g to be considered a non-blocking switch.
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thibault LeboucqAuthor Commented:
Perfect answer
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Fred MarshallPrincipalCommented:
The speed between two devices will also depend on their respective NIC speeds.  
There's no sense having a 10GB switch that's supporting 1GB NICs....
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thibault LeboucqAuthor Commented:
Of course i'll update all my device to be 10GB enable.
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