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How to test for non existence of a string in ksh

Posted on 2014-09-25
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Last Modified: 2014-09-25
HI, I have written a shell script that has the following line in it:

if [ `grep ${HOST} ${HOME_DIR}/.dump_locations.txt` ]
then
......A
else
.....B
fi

Basically I am trying to find the value of HOST in a text file, and then either do A or B. This works perfectly.

However, if I try for a non existence test it gives me "argument expected":

i.e. if I do:

if [ ! `grep ${HOST} ${HOME_DIR}/.dump_locations.txt` ]
then
......B
else
.......A
fi

I get the error:

ksh: test: argument expected

I tried using -z to see if the string value of $HOST is 0, but it still gives me the same error.
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Question by:BadHatHarry
2 Comments
 
LVL 68

Accepted Solution

by:
woolmilkporc earned 500 total points
ID: 40344477
If "grep" doesn't find anything ksh will just see "if [ ! ]" which is syntactically wrong.

Omit the square brackets and the backticks, so the test will be against the return code instead of the (found or not found) string:

if ! grep -q ${HOST} ${HOME_DIR}/.dump_locations.txt
...

"-q" instructs "grep" to suppress all output and to just set the return code.

If you insist in testing for strings you can well use the "-z" test:

if [[ -z `grep ${HOST} ${HOME_DIR}/.dump_locations.txt` ]]
...


"-z" returns a "true" value if the lenght of the following string is zero.

Please note the double square brackets!

That's the reason why "-z" didn't work for you. Use either double brackets or enclose the command substitution part in double quotes:

if [ -z "`grep ${HOST} ${HOME_DIR}/.dump_locations.txt`" ]
...
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:BadHatHarry
ID: 40344606
Both solutions worked great.
0

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